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Sixpenny Novels: Rupert Of Hentzau : Being A Sequel To The Prisoner Of Zenda

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Rupert of Hentzau by Anthony Hope - Free at Loyal Books

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This is the sequel to ‘The Prisoner of Zenda ‘. Five years have passed. The King has become jealous of Rudolf Rassendyll and suspicious of the queen (Flavia)’s feelings towards him. Flavia decides that this must be the last year in which she sends to Rudolf the single red rose that betokens her love, and therefore she also sends via Fritz von Tarlenheim, her letter of good-bye.

Count Rupert of Hentzau, banished from Ruritania after the incidents of the earlier book, is plotting his return. In furtherance of his scheme he obtains both letter and rose, and plots to place them before the King. Rudolf, Fritz and Sapt must prevent this at all costs…

First Page:

RUPERT OF HENTZAU

FROM THE MEMOIRS OF FRITZ VON TARLENHEIM

Sequel to The Prisoner of Zenda

By Anthony Hope

I. THE QUEEN'S GOOD BY II. A STATION WITHOUT A CAB III. AGAIN TO ZENDA IV. AN EDDY ON THE MOAT V. AN AUDIENCE OF THE KING VI. THE TASK OF THE QUEEN'S SERVANTS VII. THE MESSAGE OF SIMON THE HUNTSMAN VIII. THE TEMPER OF BORIS THE HOUND IX. THE KING IN THE HUNTING LODGE X. THE KING IN STRELSAU XI. WHAT THE CHANCELLOR'S WIFE SAW XII. BEFORE THEM ALL! XIII. A KING UP HIS SLEEVE XIV. THE NEWS COMES TO STRELSAU XV. A PASTIME FOR COLONEL SAPT XVI. A CROWD IN THE KONIGSTRASSE XVII. YOUNG RUPERT AND THE PLAY ACTOR XVIII. THE TRIUMPH OF THE KING XIX. FOR OUR LOVE AND HER HONOR XX. THE DECISION OF HEAVEN XXI. THE COMING OF THE DREAM

CHAPTER I. THE QUEEN'S GOOD BY

A man who has lived in the world, marking how every act, although in itself perhaps light and insignificant, may become the source of consequences that spread far and wide, and flow for years or centuries, could scarcely feel secure in reckoning that with the death of the Duke of Strelsau and the restoration of King Rudolf to liberty and his throne, there would end, for good and all, the troubles born of Black Michael's daring conspiracy. Continue reading book >>

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Articles

The Prisoner of Zenda

The Prisoner of Zenda

Swordfights, midnight rides, castles and dungeons. The Prisoner of Zenda is the classic romantic adventure
When Rudolf Rassendyll decides to take a journey to see his distant cousin crowned king of Ruritania, it soon becomes apparent that it is not going to be a routine trip. The first indication of this comes with the realization that he bears an uncanny resemblance to his cousin. Added to that there is the discovery that Black Michael, a relative of the rightful king, is determined to prevent the coronation taking place, so that he might receive the crown himself.
What follows is an adventure involving abduction, imprisonment and deceit. As the story races to its conclusion, Rudolf Rassendyll faces choices that will determine not only his future, but the futures of King Rudolf, Princess Flavia and the whole of Ruritania.
Published in 1894, The Prisoner of Zenda launched Hope's writing career, and was followed by the sequel, Rupert of Hentzau.

About the Author

Anthony Hope was the pen name of Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins. Born in London on 9th February 1863, Hope studied at the prestigious Marlborough School before attending Balliol College, Oxford University. He received a first-class degree and, in 1887, went to work as a lawyer. An ambitious man, Hope began writing stories in his free time and published his first novel, A Man of Mark, in 1890. Most of his novels were adventure stories, typified by The Prisoner of Zenda, his best-known work. Based on The Prisoner of Zenda's success, Hope gave up his legal career and began writing full time, publishing many popular novels, plays and short stories. Rupert of Hentzau, the sequel to The Prisoner of Zenda, was published in 1898, and continued where The Prisoner of Zenda left off. Among the many books Hope published are Tristram of Blent (1901), Double Harness (1904), Sophy of Kravonia (1906), The Heart of Princess Osra (1896) and Lucinda (1920). Hope married Elizabeth Somerville in 1903, and was knighted in 1918 for services to his country during World War I. Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins died at his home in Surrey on 8th July 1933.

Praise For The Prisoner of Zenda

"I highly recommend Campfire’s comics. They do what they are intended to do and do it in a way that excites kids about classic literature."

— Chris Wilson, The Graphic Classroom (a resource for teachers and librarians)

Source:

www.indiebound.org

Rupert of Hentzau

Rupert of Hentzau

Rupert of Hentzau

infobox Book |
name = Rupert of Hentzau
orig title =
translator =


image_caption = Cover of 1898 US Grosset & Dunlap edition
author = Anthony Hope
cover_artist =
illustrator = Charles Dana Gibson
country = United Kingdom
language = English
series =
genre = Adventure novel
publisher = J. W. Arrowsmith. Bristol & London
release_date = 1898 (written in 1894)
media_type = Print (Hardback & Paperback )
pages = 385 pp
isbn = NA
preceded_by = The Prisoner of Zenda
followed_by =

"Rupert of Hentzau " is a sequel by Anthony Hope to " The Prisoner of Zenda ", written in 1895. but not published until 1898 .

The story is set within a framing narrative told by a supporting character from " The Prisoner of Zenda ". The frame implies that the events related in both books took place in the late 1870s and early 1880s. This story commences three years after the conclusion of "Zenda", and deals with the same fictional country somewhere in Germanic Middle Europe. the kingdom of Ruritania. Most of the same characters recur: Rudolf Elphberg, the dissolute absolute monarch of Ruritania; Rudolf Rassendyll, the English gentleman who had acted as his political decoy. being his distant cousin and look alike ; Flavia, the princess, now queen; Rupert of Hentzau, the dashing well-born villain; Fritz von Tarlenheim, the loyal courtier.

Queen Flavia, dutifully but unhappily married to her cousin Rudolf V, writes to her true love Rudolf Rassendyll. The letter is carried by von Tarlenheim to be delivered by hand, but it is stolen by the exiled Rupert of Hentzau, who sees in it a chance to return to favour by informing the pathologically jealous and paranoid King. Rassendyll returns to Ruritania to aid the Queen, but is once more forced to impersonate the King after Rupert shoots Rudolf V. In turn, Rassendyll kills Rupert, but is assassinated in the hour of triumph by one of Rupert's henchmen - and thus is spared the crisis of conscience over whether or not to continue the royal deception for years. He is buried as the King in a state funeral. and Flavia reigns on alone, the last of the Elphberg dynasty.

Film, TV or theatrical adaptations

Several adaptations were made, although not as many as for the film career of "Zenda". Film versions of "Rupert of Hentzau" include:
*1915
*1923 with Lew Cody as Rupert, turning the tragic ending on its head (Flavia abdicates to marry Rassendyll, and Ruritania is declared a republic ).
*A spoof version, " Rupert of Hee Haw ", was released in 1924. Stan Laurel plays an alcoholic king, whose queen, Mae Laurel. deposes and replaces him with an identical salesman named Rudolph Razz. Razz's manners are so uncourtly that a courtier, James Finlayson. challenges him to a duel. (See also Lord Haw-haw .)

David O. Selznick at first considered making a film version of the novel. as a follow-up to his hugely successful 1937 film of the "The Prisoner of Zenda", using again Douglas Fairbanks Jr. He decided not to because of the tragic subject matter and his commitment to filming "Gone with the Wind ".

On screen, Rupert as a character has been played by matinee idol s such as Ramon Novarro (1922), Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. (1937), and James Mason (1952).

*gutenberg|no=1145|name=Rupert of Hentzau

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010 .

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Rupert of Hee Haw — Infobox Film name = Rupert of Hee Haw image size = caption = director = Scott Pembroke producer = Hal Roach writer = H. M. Walker narrator = starring = Stan Laurel music = cinematography = Frank Young editing = Thomas J. Crizer distributor =… … Wikipedia

Rupert — Infobox Given Name Revised name = Rupert gender = Male region = Western Europe origin = Low German footnotes = Rupert is derived from the Latin Rupertus. which is a loan from the Old German Hroberahtus ; thus it is a variation of modern English… … Wikipedia

The Prisoner of Zenda — infobox Book | name = The Prisoner of Zenda orig title = translator = image caption = Cover to 2nd edition author = Anthony Hope cover artist = country = United Kingdom language = English series = genre = Historical, Novel publisher = Penguin… … Wikipedia

The Prisoner of Zenda (1937 film) — Infobox Film name = The Prisoner of Zenda caption = Original film poster imdb id = 0029442 amg id = 1:39281 writer = Screenplay: Edward E. Rose Wells Root John L. Balderston Novel: Anthony Hope Additional dialogue: Donald Ogden Stewart Uncredited … Wikipedia

The Prisoner of Zenda (1922 film) — Infobox Film name = The Prisoner of Zenda image size = caption = director = Rex Ingram producer = Rex Ingram writer = Anthony Hope (play, uncredited, and novel) Edward E. Rose (play, uncredited) Mary O Hara starring = Lewis Stone Alice Terry… … Wikipedia

The Prisoner of Zenda (1952 film) — Infobox Film name = The Prisoner of Zenda caption = Original film poster director = Richard Thorpe producer = Pandro S. Berman writer = Anthony Hope (novel) Edward E. Rose Wells Root Noel Langley John L. Balderston (screenplay) Donald Ogden… … Wikipedia

The Sword of Shannara — This article is about the fantasy novel. For the fictional sword, see Sword of Shannara. The Sword of Shannara   … Wikipedia

List of fictional European countries — This is a partial list of fictional countries in Europe.List moved from elsewhereEastern Europe*Adjikistan: Featured Eurasian country in. *Alvania: Balkan kingdom from the movie The Royal Rider *Anatruria: Balkanic kingdom in the Bernie… … Wikipedia

The Heart of Princess Osra — infobox Book | name = The Heart of Princess Osra title orig = translator = image caption = First edition cover author = Anthony Hope cover artist = country = United Kingdom language = English series = genre = Historical novel publisher =… … Wikipedia

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en.academic.ru

The Prisoner of Zenda

The Prisoner of Zenda/ Rupert of Hentzau

If identical strangers, random European kingdoms, scheming relatives, and political intrigue sounds like a plot you've heard before, that's because The Prisoner of Zenda is the mother of all political adventure novels.

Rudolf Rassendyll, like many of his forefathers, is living proof of the infidelity of one ancestor's wife with a prince of Ruritania, a small Central European kingdom. But he never realized how much until he travels there himself and meets the crown prince (conveniently also named Rudolf). who could easily be his twin. Which comes in handy when said prince is drugged the day of his coronation as king, and Rudolf has to fill in. It's even more convenient after the king is kidnapped by his scheming half-brother Michael, and Rudolf is forced to play king while plotting his rescue. Considering that he's fallen head over heals in love with the kings prospective wife, not all of these duties are particularly burdensome for him. But how will he tell her that he's not the Rudolf she thinks he is, and what will happen if he can't rescue the royal prisoner from Zenda? Find out in this 1894 bestseller.

If you like classic adventure stories or enjoy novels set in fictional European principalities, this one may be for you. But don't get me started on Rupert of Hentzau. ( )

One of my all-time favorites, chiefly for Prisoner --Rupert is too sad for me. I can still recall reading it I suppose about 50 years ago. I also love the movie versions. ( )

Prisoner of Zenda was fantastic, very enjoyable, with great humor and pacing. Rupert of Hentzau lacked all its charm and was awful.

The Prisoner of Zenda. The Prisoner of Zenda is an enjoyable adventure story in the vein of King Solomon's Mines. Around the World in Eighty Days. Scaramouche. and even a bit of Wilkie Collins' thrillers. Rudolf Rassendyll is the second son in the nobel house of Burlesdon of England. His brother is an aristocrat but Rudolf doesn't quite conform to his sister-in-law's ideas of gentility. First there is the matter of his hair. It's red. This may not sound like a crime, but way up in the family tree there's a Ruritanian lord, Rudolf Elphberg, who came to England and had an affair with the Countess Amelia. He was wounded in a duel with her husband, but Elphberg survived while Baron Rassendyll died six months later of a chill he had caught during the early-morning duel. And two months after that, his wife gave birth to Elphberg's child, a son. And the family simply absorbed him into itself, though it wished it could forget the entire sordid affair. This is why our hero Rudolf's red hair and distinctive nose made him such a scapegrace in his family. And he lives up to those nefarious features by being a young gentleman of independent means and an adventurous disposition.

When he takes it into his head to visit Ruritania, he is mistaken for the king, and soon embroiled in a plot to rescue the captured king from his power-hungry brother Black Michael. Rudolf must play the part of the king to Ruritania and woo the Princess Flavia, who falls in love with him. And he falls in love with her. But Rudolf cannot stay and play king forever. The real king is languishing in Black Michael's castle at Zenda, and is guarded in such a way that rescue is nearly impossible. He is growing ill meanwhile, and must be rescued soon. If he dies there, Black Michael will kill Rudolf and seize the throne for himself. But as long as the king lives, Black Michael and Rudolf must keep up the pretense that Rudolf really is the king. Black Michael can't expose him because to do so would be to admit where the real king was, and Rudolf can't expose Black Michael's treachery without revealing that he is really not the king.

The writing is a bit abrupt and choppy, and sometimes the characters were over the top, but the plot kept me reading and I really wanted to know what happened next. Hope creates an interesting villain in Black Michael's right-hand man, Rupert of Hentzau. who also happens to be in love with the woman who loves Black Michael, Antoinette de Mauban. Of course Rupert escapes in the end and there is a sequel that bears his name. I'm sufficiently interested to seek it out, just to see what Hope does with him. And of course one wants to know if there is more to the story of Rudolf and Flavia.

I read this book in one sitting. Overall, it was an enjoyable adventure story and I would recommend it to fans of historical fiction.

Rupert of Hentzau. Rupert of Hentzau is the sequel to Anthony Hope's adventure classic The Prisoner of Zenda. One of the primary villains of the first book was Rupert of Hentzau, whose charismatic and colorful villainy commanded a sort of respect from even his worst enemies. Rupert escapes at the end of the first book, in order to reappear as the leading villain of this story. He manages to get a hold of a compromising letter that Queen Flavia had written to Rudolf, and threatens to use it for blackmail. The Queen's honor is at stake and it's up to the small cadre of heroes from the first book to hunt down Rupert and destroy the fateful letter.

Somehow Rupert loses the distinctive flourish he had in the first book. Rudolf is similarly changed; I thought him was a bit too strictly moral in this story as opposed to his more lighthearted, devil-may-care self in Zenda. Maybe it was just that he had matured into a man, or maybe it was Flavia's love that elevated him to such heights. but I preferred his former self. It must have been such fun for Hope to write a character like that.

The story is told in the first person by Fritz. I rather missed Rudolf's humorous narration from the first book, but Fritz is tolerable. The writing is decent as well — nothing really special. The action is engaging and the characters are pretty good. It reminds me a great deal of Henryk Sienkiewicz's Polish trilogy (only much, much shorter, of course!).

This is the sort of book that is enjoyable despite the end. It seemed Hope was taking the easy way out and not diminishing Rudolf's character by making him take either of the choices afforded him. It is rather maddening at the end, to not know what Rudolf had decided. I don't want to give away any more than that. That ending is what shaved off the extra half-star on my rating for this book. ( )

A fast-moving, swashbuckling adventure set in a fictional country, Ruritania. If you love stories with a "zorro" feel (sword fights, dangerous plotting, charming villains and elegant romance) you will love this book.
The ending is somewhat sad however, and leaves an important issue undiscovered by the reader. I believe that Hope did this just to annoy us. ) ( )

▾ Book descriptions

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014043755X. Paperback)

Best known for his political fairy tale, The Prisoner of Zenda, which saw four major screen adaptations, including the acclaimed 1937 incarnation starring Ronald Colman, Anthony Hope was one of the few novelists to achieve wide popular and critical admiration during his lifetime.

Regarded by many critics as the finest adventure story ever written -- and certainly one of the most popular -- The Prisoner of Zenda (1894) tells the story of Rudolf Rassendyl, a dashing English gentleman who bears an uncanny resemblance to the ruler of the fictional kingdom of Ruritania. Rassendyl masquerades as the king in order to save the country from a treacherous plot and secures the release of the wronged prisoner. In the process he wins the heart of the beautiful princess Flavia, but ultimately surrenders the crown and the hand of his beloved princess to the rightful ruler.

Rupert of Hentzau, which ends in tragedy rather than triumph, is the darker, more problematic sequel to The Prisoner of Zenda. Full of swash-buckling feats of heroism as well as witty irony, these adventure tales are also wonderfully executed satires on late nineteenth-century European politics.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:33 -0400)

▾ Library descriptions

Two romances about Rudolph Rassendyll, an English gentleman in a foreign land. In the first, he masquerades as his cousin the King to save Ruritania from vicious Black Michel; and in the second, he returns to Ruritania to try to prevent Rupert of Hentzau from delivering a letter that compromises the queen. … (more )

Source:

www.librarything.com

The Prisoner of Zenda (Literature) - TV Tropes

Literature / The Prisoner of Zenda

The Prisoner of Zenda is an adventure novel by Anthony Hope, published in 1894. The king of the fictional country of Ruritania is abducted on the eve of his coronation, and the hero, an English gentleman on holiday who fortuitously resembles the monarch due to being his distant cousin, is persuaded to act as his political decoy in an attempt to save the situation.

When Rudolf is forced to keep up the pretense for longer than a simple coronation, he finds himself having to deal with Duke Black Michael: the King's brother, kidnapper, and attempted usurper of the throne. He also becomes acquainted with Flavia, the King's beautiful young cousin. who suddenly finds herself more attracted to the ruler than ever before.

The book is responsible for many tropes on this site that are listed below. Likewise, it has been remade into several films, books and episodes of series since.

This work features examples of:
  • Affably Evil. Rupert of Hentzau.
  • Anti-Villain. Michael
  • Aristocrats Are Evil. Michael is a double subversion. He is an aristocrat (Duke of Strelsau and a Prince, if not in line to the throne because his parents' marriage was morganatic). He subverts it by being an evil Duke, since Dukes tend to be good. He then subverts that when it's pointed out that his father specifically gave him a freshly created duchy (which is ruled from the capital city, no less) in the hopes that being the second-most powerful noble in the kingdom would be enough to sate his ambition (it wasn't).
  • Beardness Protection Program. Double subverted. Rudolf shaves his beard when he begins to impersonate the king. Both the king and Rudolf are bearded to begin with, but the beard removal is a convenient justification for why something about the king seems off.
  • Becoming the Mask
  • Bittersweet Ending
  • Bleed 'em and Weep. Antoinette. Somewhat subverted in that after she misses the first shot, she pauses and visibly forces herself to calm down. Rudolf doesn't wait for her to aim properly.
  • Did Not Get the Girl
  • Emergency Impersonation. Rudolf first impersonates the King at the coronation when Prince Michael drugs the king (hoping to discredit the King by making it look like he missed his coronation due to a horrendous hangover). Later becomes more serious once the King's abduction is discovered.
  • Enigmatic Minion. Rupert of Hentzau.
  • Even Bad Men Love Their Mamas. During one of their bantering conversations, Rudolf, who like others knows about Rupert's womanizing and immoral behavior causing his mother grief, comments "Thank God" when Rupert replies in the affirmative that his mother is dead. This angers Rupert and causes him to momentarily lose his affable mask.
  • The Evil Prince
  • Fake King
  • Gentleman Adventurer. Rudolf is an example of the good version, and the book also has an Evil Counterpart on Michael's side, Detchard, who is a mercenary but just as loyal to Michael as Rudolf is to the King (and at least an equal swordsman; Rudolf admits he probably would have lost if the delirious king hadn't intervened).
  • Heroes Want Redheads. Princess Flavia, in this case.
  • Heroic Bastard. Rudolf, the hero, is illegitimately related to the royal family of Ruritania. Black Michael is a "double bastard".
  • High Dive Escape. Rupert dives into the moat to escape from Zenda, though Rudolf pursues him into the forest. Rupert's final escape comes when he steals a horse from a passing peasant girl.
  • Honor Before Reason. If not for this, the plot would have been: Rudolf exiles or kills Sapt and Fritz von Tarlenheim, lets the king get killed, marries the girl and becomes king in his own right. Sapt lampshades it about a third of the way in.
  • Identical Stranger. King Rudolf and Rudolf Rassendyll although, in this case, they are distant cousins.
  • Improvised Weapon. The tea-table used to Shield Bash three men.
  • Jumping Off the Slippery Slope. Pretty much every character, but especially Michael.
  • Love Makes You Evil. One of Black Michael's reasons for overthrowing the King of Ruritania is that he loves the King's fiancee Flavia, and Rupert wants to get Black Michael's mistress into bed and ends up killing Michael because of it .
  • Lost in Imitation
  • Magnificent Bastard. Rupert of Hentzau.
  • Mexican Standoff. Rudolf describes the situation between him and Black Michael in this way. He even name-drops "The Critic", a play written in 1779, which is considered the first parody of the trope.

Rudolf: ' "In fact, Fritz," said I, "I am reminded of a situation in one of our English plays�The Critic�have you heard of it? Or, if you like, of two men, each covering the other with a revolver. For I can't expose Michael without exposing myself. "

Rudolf: "And, hang me if Michael won't expose himself, if he tries to expose me!"

  • Quirky Miniboss Squad. Rupert and Black Michael's other minions, referred to in the story as "The Six".
  • Pragmatic Adaptation. The 1937 Ronald Colman film version is generally considered to be the best of the cinematic versions and one of the best swashbucklers ever made, though it changes some details, as in introducing Hentzau near the beginning and making Flavia a blonde. It launched the career of David Niven (von Tarlenheim) and proved that Douglas Fairbanks Jr. (Hentzau) could play a convincing villain.
  • Red Baron. Prince Michael, Duke of Strelsau, is very rarely referred to by any other name than "Black Michael".
  • Red-Headed Stepchild. Rudolf's sister-in-law expresses somewhat joking condemnation of his red hair, as this trait serves as a reminder that one of the earlier kings of Ruritania had an affair with one of the countesses in the (traditionally dark-haired) family, and thus it's essentially knowledge that the current earl (Rudolf's brother) has an illegitimate claim to the title.
  • Redemption Equals Death. Guess.
  • Reliable Traitor. Rupert of Hentzau.
  • Royal Blood
  • Royally Screwed Up
  • Ruritania. The Trope Namer. with a few splashes of Unbuilt Trope (See Unbuilt Trope below)
  • Secondary Character Title. The Prisoner of Zenda barely appears in the book itself as he is, well, imprisoned. The lead character is his distant relative and relative.
  • Sequel Hook. At the end of The Prisoner of Zenda. Rupert of Hentzau has escaped, and the novel closes with Rudolf musing on that loose end, as well as a personal feeling that he might yet have some "part to play" in the world. There was, of course, a sequel titled Rupert of Hentzau .
  • The Starscream. Rupert of Hentzau.
  • Succession Crisis
  • Sure, Let's Go with That. Upon Rupert's return from, allegedly, the Tyrol, his friend Featherly assumes that he met some woman there and carried on a dalliance with her, which is why he didn't let anyone know where he was going. Rupert decides that this is as good an explanation as any and drops hints to reinforce the notion.
  • Swashbuckler
  • Unbuilt Trope. Despite being the trope namer for tiny, fictional backwaters Hope's Ruritania is apparently at least a middling sized, reasonably modern (by late 19th century standards) kingdom. Zenda itself has a handsome modern chateau built around the medieval castle, the capital city of Streslau is described by Rassendyll (a Londoner no less) as a "great city" and the narrative even notes the kingdom has played important roles in European history. It's essentially the Austro-Hungarian Empire with the serial numbers filed off.
    • The early imitation Ruritanias also tended to be pretty idyllic places, whereas Stephenson's Ruritania is not. Socio-economic divides are huge, banditry is rife, the king is not particularly competent and so impopular he needs to marry a well-liked noblewoman to gain popularity by proxy, but still an absolute monarch, and infighting in the royal family has pushed the nation to the brink of civil war.
  • The Usurper. What the plot is built on.
  • Villain with Good Publicity. The Evil Prince. Black Michael, is beloved the people in the "Old Town" of Streslau and in his seat of Zenda, at least. The rest of the city's people are for King Rudolf, and we're never given much insight on how the people of the rest of the country feel.
  • The Wrongful Heir to the Throne. While the heroes definitely think that Michael is the wrong man for the throne (Sapt would rather have the imposter Rudolf stay there than give the throne over to Black Michael), by the end of their adventures together, they wistfully reflect that they wouldn't mind having Rassendyl remain on the throne. As Fritz puts it, "Heaven doesn't always make the right men kings!"
  • You Fight Like a Cow. Rudolf and Rupert have several banter-filled duels of the kind affectionately parodied in The Princess Bride .
  • Adaptations of The Prisoner of Zenda :
    • The paramount of the adaptations is the straight one made in 1937.
    • The 1952 film version is virtually a shot-by-shot remade of the 1937 film, albeit in color. They even used the same score.
    • The Fourth Doctor serial Androids of Tara is a largely faithful adaptation set in space .
    • The 1979 film version is a comic vehicle for Peter Sellers. It's regarded as one of his weakest films, and when Peter saw it he said to the producers: "I have only one comment to make - my lawyers will be in touch with you."
    • The television series Prisoner of Zenda Inc. is a corporate-themed adaptation of the work.
    • The film Moon Over Parador
    • The 1993 film Dave . starring Kevin Kline, where Ruritania is replaced by the United States of America.
    • An episode of Hercules: The Legendary Journeys . where Iolaus was the king's cousin, although the king, once rescued, actually acknowledged Iolaus was doing a better job and vowed to learn to be like that.
    • The Robert A. Heinlein novel Double Star borrowed the "must take the place of the kidnapped leader'' bit as its main plot. IN SPACE .
    • The second Flashman novel (Royal Flash ) is a Zenda homage. Given the series' setup. Flashman claims Hope plagiarized the story from him.
    • The Care Bears: Adventure in Wonderland swapped the social satire of Alice in Wonderland for this kind of plot.
    • The Get Smart episode "The King Lives?", with Agent 86 taking the place of the missing King Charles. One of the few episodes to have a sequel ("To Sire, With Love").
    • The Edgar Rice Burroughs novel The Mad King draws heavily on The Prisoner of Zenda (although moves the setting to World War One ).
    • The Time Wars novel The Zenda Vendetta. in which time-travelling terrorists murder Rudolf Rassendyll, so one of the heroes — who fortuitously also resembles the monarch — has to impersonate him impersonating the King.
    • Inverted at one point on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine . At one point, a Time Travel incident leads to a historical figure getting killed before the events that made him famous. Since he's not famous yet, what he looks like doesn't really matter, except that he was black and his race was significant. So Captain Sisko ends up taking his place to preserve the timeline. A few seasons later, Nog is looking at a file about Earth history, and he finds a section on this guy with a picture. He remarks how he looks just like Captain Sisko.
    • The 1965 film The Great Race has a sequence in which the villain Professor Fate is taken for the imbecillic Prince Frederick Hapnick; Baron von Stuppe plays the Hentzau part, complete with a bungled High Dive Escape .
    • The book was recently condensed for Malaysian secondary schools as part of a program to expose classic English Literature to the public.
    • One issue of Jon Sable, Freelance is a Whole Plot Reference to The Prisoner of Zenda. with Jon playing the Rudolf role.
    • One Adventures in Odyssey episode is a Whole Plot Reference to The Prisoner of Zenda .
    • Kim Newman 's novel The Hound of the D'Urbervilles borrows several characters and situations from The Prisoner of Zenda. especially in "A Shambles in Belgravia", which tosses Irene Adler into the Ruritanian succession debacle.
    • Ace Attorney Investigations 2 has this with Zheng Fa president Teikun Ō, whose body double steps in for him after his death. Except the body double was part of the group that conspired to assassinate him in the first place.
    • Victorian Romance Emma its plot and dialogue is used to parallel the romantic problems a character is having.
    . Indexes.

    Source:

    tvtropes.org

    The Prisoner of Zenda

    The Prisoner of Zenda abigailadams26

    Anthony Hope's The Prisoner of Zenda is a rollicking good read, a true swashbuckler, complete with all the mysterious coincidence, dastardly plots, and smashing sword-fights that any reader could want. With a light-hearted but noble young hero, a beautiful and honorable princess, and a handsome, fearless villain who sometimes steals the show, this book will have you racing for the end. I myself started it on my morning commute, finished it the same evening, and am already considering how best to locate the sequels. After all, I simply MUST find out what happens to Rupert of Hentzau. It is interesting to note that my edition of this classic tale (first published in 1894), was released by the Looking Glass Library in 1961, as part of their line of classics for young readers. Not generally considered children's fiction these days, The Prisoner of Zenda is recommended by the editors of this edition for readers ages 8-14. How times (and expectations) have changed!I was initially drawn to this story by the fact that Ruritania - the imaginary kingdom that Hope creates as a setting for his hero's adventures - has given its name to an entire genre of novels. Having come across the phrase "Ruritanian Fantasy" many times in the course of my research into children's literature and fantasy fiction, I eventually decided it was high time to read the novel that has come to define an entire genre. I am certainly glad I did.

    Related Editors' Picks The Prisoner of Zenda

    Source:

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    Месть Руперта (Rupert of Hentzau: From The Memoirs of Fritz Von Tarlenheim ) - читать на английском языке, пере


    The Project Gutenberg EBook of Rupert of Hentzau, by Anthony Hope

    This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
    almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
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    with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org


    Title: Rupert of Hentzau
    From The Memoirs of Fritz Von Tarlenheim: The Sequel to
    The Prisoner of Zenda

    Author: Anthony Hope

    Release Date: August 3, 2008 [EBook #1145]
    Last Updated: January 25, 2013

    Produced by An Anonymous Volunteer, and David Widger

    RUPERT OF HENTZAU FROM THE MEMOIRS OF FRITZ VON TARLENHEIM Sequel to The Prisoner of Zenda By Anthony Hope


    CHAPTER I. THE QUEEN'S GOOD-BY

    CHAPTER II. A STATION WITHOUT A CAB

    CHAPTER III. AGAIN TO ZENDA

    CHAPTER IV. AN EDDY ON THE MOAT

    CHAPTER V. AN AUDIENCE OF THE KING

    CHAPTER VI. THE TASK OF THE QUEEN'S SERVANTS

    CHAPTER VII. THE MESSAGE OF SIMON THE HUNTSMAN

    CHAPTER VIII. THE TEMPER OF BORIS THE HOUND

    CHAPTER IX. THE KING IN THE HUNTING LODGE

    CHAPTER X. THE KING IN STRELSAU

    CHAPTER XI. WHAT THE CHANCELLOR'S WIFE SAW

    CHAPTER XII. BEFORE THEM ALL!

    CHAPTER XIII. A KING UP HIS SLEEVE

    CHAPTER XIV. THE NEWS COMES TO STRELSAU

    CHAPTER XV. A PASTIME FOR COLONEL SAPT

    CHAPTER XVI. A CROWD IN THE KONIGSTRASSE

    CHAPTER XVII. YOUNG RUPERT AND THE PLAY-ACTOR

    CHAPTER XVIII. THE TRIUMPH OF THE KING

    CHAPTER XIX. FOR OUR LOVE AND HER HONOR

    CHAPTER XX. THE DECISION OF HEAVEN

    CHAPTER XXI. THE COMING OF THE DREAM

    CHAPTER I. THE QUEEN'S GOOD-BY

    A man who has lived in the world, marking how every act, although in itself perhaps light and insignificant, may become the source of consequences that spread far and wide, and flow for years or centuries, could scarcely feel secure in reckoning that with the death of the Duke of Strelsau and the restoration of King Rudolf to liberty and his throne, there would end, for good and all, the troubles born of Black Michael's daring conspiracy. The stakes had been high, the struggle keen; the edge of passion had been sharpened, and the seeds of enmity sown. Yet Michael, having struck for the crown, had paid for the blow with his life: should there not then be an end? Michael was dead, the Princess her cousin's wife, the story in safe keeping, and Mr. Rassendyll's face seen no more in Ruritania. Should there not then be an end? So said I to my friend the Constable of Zenda, as we talked by the bedside of Marshal Strakencz. The old man, already nearing the death that soon after robbed us of his aid and counsel, bowed his head in assent: in the aged and ailing the love of peace breeds hope of it. But Colonel Sapt tugged at his gray moustache, and twisted his black cigar in his mouth, saying, " You're very sanguine, friend Fritz. But is Rupert of Hentzau dead? I had not heard it. "

    Source:

    liteka.ru

    Prisoner of Zenda, The (1937) - Internet Movie Firearms Database - Guns in Movies, TV and Video Games

    Prisoner of Zenda, The (1937)

    The Prisoner of Zenda (1937)

    The Prisoner of Zenda is a 1937 adaptation of Anthony Hope's 1894 novel of the same name directed by John Cromwell starring Ronald Colman and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Although not the first cinematic adaptation, this is considered the definitive version. The original novel had a sequel, Rupert of Hentzau. but producer David O. Selznick declined to film a sequel, partly because it was depressing and more importantly, he was busy with Gone with the Wind . The film was remade. shot for shot, in color in 1952 using almost an identical script and an identical score, starring Stewart Granger and James Mason.


    The following weapons were used in the film The Prisoner of Zenda :

    Contents Gasser Montenegrin M1880

    Various characters are seen using bone-handled Gasser Montenegrin M1880 in throughout the film.

    Gasser M1880 Montenegrin - 11.3x36Rmm "Montenegrin"

    Actual screen-used Gasser Montenegrin M1880 from The Prisoner Of Zenda - image courtesy of the Armchair Gun Show, who are selling the original prop.

    Rupert of Hentzau (Douglas Fairbanks Jr. ) with his Gasser Montenegrin.

    Colonel Zapt (C. Aubrey Smith ) fires his Gasser Montenegrin. (Smith had played the lead role in 1896 stage production.)

    Johann (Byron Foulger ) hands Rudolf Rassendyll (Ronald Colman ) a Gasser Montenegrin. This shot shows off the bone grips.

    Rudolf threatens a guard with is Gasser Montenegrin.

    Rupert levels his revolver at Rudolf.

    Rupert's henchmen fire their Gassers.

    Smith & Wesson Schofield

    Colonel Zapt (C. Aubrey Smith ) and Captain Fritz von Tarlenheim (David Niven ) are armed with what appear to be Smith & Wesson Schofield revolvers for part of the film.

    Smith & Wesson Schofield Model 3 with blued finish - .45 Schofield.

    Col. Zapt shoots open a lock with his revolver.

    Captain Fritz von Tarlenheim fires his revolver.

    Double Barreled Shotgun

    Colonel Zapt and Captain Fritz von Tarlenheim are armed with Double Barreled Shotguns when they first meet Rudolf Rassendyll (Ronald Colman ).

    Charles Parker 1878 Side by Side Shotgun - 12 Gauge

    Colonel Zapt and Captain Fritz von Tarlenheim meet Rudolf Rassendyll. These appear to be muzzle-loaded shotguns.

    Webley RIC-type

    Rudolf Rassendyll uses a Webley RIC or copy when he goes to meet Antoinette de Mauban (Mary Astor).

    Webley RIC No. 1 Second Pattern - .442 Webley

    Rassendyll approaches the rendezvous with revolver drawn.

    Rassendyll takes cover.

    Unidentifiable rifles

    Ruritanian troops are seen with rifles in the film, but they are not clear enough to identify.

    An honor guard with their rifles.

    A rack of rifles in the background.

    Cannon

    Multiple field guns open fire to salute Rudolf's coronation.

    Source:

    www.imfdb.org

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