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Travels With A Donkey And An Inland Voyage - Isbn:9781340632564

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  • Book Title: Travels with a Donkey and an Inland Voyage
  • ISBN 13: 9781340632564
  • ISBN 10: 134063256X
  • Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Category:
  • Category (general): Other
  • Publisher: Palala Press
  • Format & Number of pages: 328 pages, book
  • Synopsis: This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

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Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes by Robert Louis Stevenson - Free at Loyal Books

Description

A classic of travel writing, this book recounts Stevenson's adventures on an extended walk through uplands and mountains in south-western France. Humorous on his own failings as a traveller, and on his travails with Modestine the self-willed donkey, it is also an exploration of peasant life in an area marked by the violence of the wars of religion. This version includes the fragment "A mountain town in France", originally intended as the opening chapter, but often omitted and published as a separate essay.

First Page:

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

Of this SWANSTON EDITION in Twenty five Volumes of the Works of ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON Two Thousand and Sixty Copies have been printed, of which only Two Thousand Copies are for sale.

This is No. 1678

[Illustration: AN INLAND VOYAGE TITLE PAGE DESIGNED BY MR. WALTER CRANE]

THE WORKS OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY ANDREW LANG

LONDON: PUBLISHED BY CHATTO AND WINDUS: IN ASSOCIATION WITH CASSELL AND COMPANY LIMITED: WILLIAM HEINEMANN: AND LONGMANS GREEN AND COMPANY MDCCCCXI

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

PAGE INTRODUCTION TO THE SWANSTON EDITION ix

AN INLAND VOYAGE

ANTWERP TO BOOM 7

ON THE WILLEBROEK CANAL 11

THE ROYAL SPORT NAUTIQUE 16

ON THE SAMBRE CANALISED: TO QUARTES 26

PONT SUR SAMBRE: WE ARE PEDLARS 31 THE TRAVELLING MERCHANT 36

ON THE SAMBRE CANALISED: TO LANDRECIES 41

AT LANDRECIES 46

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  • The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 6

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 2

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 9

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 15

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 21

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 14

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 4

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 25

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 3

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 5

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 7

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 20

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 11

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 23

    Master of Ballantrae

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 13

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 16

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 17

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 19

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 22

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 8

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 18

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 24

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 10

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  • Articles

    Travels with a Donkey; An Inland Voyage; The Silverado Squatters by Robert Louis Stevenson

    Travels with a Donkey; An Inland Voyage; The Silverado Squatters

    In a sail-powered canoe, on foot with a pack-donkey, playing house in a derelict silver mine, Stevenson celebrates the romance of life as a voluntary inland castaway. From canalside Belgium and darkest rural France to the wild west, he gazeteersMore In a sail-powered canoe, on foot with a pack-donkey, playing house in a derelict silver mine, Stevenson celebrates the romance of life as a voluntary inland castaway. From canalside Belgium and darkest rural France to the wild west, he gazeteers history, landscape and inhabitants with equal enthusiasm, despite being taken from a madman; in his youthful relish and supreme disregard for discomfort, this precursor of Kerouac and Chatwin joys in his life on the open road. Less

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    Community Reviews

    Guguk rated it liked it

    about 1 year ago

    Rating rata-2 kisah-2 perjalanan Mr. Stevenson ini

    - An Inland Voyage. 3 bintang
    Lumayan lucu, tapi lucu-lucu-sinis dan kurang 'seru' (^ ^;)>

    - Travels with a Donkey. 3.5 bintang
    Modestine

    (^. ^) begitu keledai ini muncul, aku jadi tertarik bacanya

    Greg rated it really liked it

    about 3 years ago

    Very enjoyable, charming book. A different type of travel writing, and takes one back to another time. I doubt that same experience could be done today.

    I have an old hardback Everymans Library edition. Travels With A Donkey (read) Inland Voyage (read) and Silverado Squatt. Read full review

    Carl rated it really liked it

    about 2 years ago

    Source:

    www.goodreads.com

    Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes

    Travels with a Donkey

    References in periodicals archive ?

    In the early essays, An Inland Voyage and Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes. a process of authorial self-construction is at work that anticipates the modern self of his Gothic fiction.

    I shall be considering the two early pieces, accounts of his travels in Europe, An Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes (1879); his account of a journey from Glasgow to the west coast of America by ship and train, The Amateur Emigrant (1895), and his account of travels in Polynesia, In the South Seas (published posthumously in 1896).

    I suggest that Stevenson's predisposition to experiment with the Gothic predates 'the Gothic period' identified by Hogle and that the narrators of the two earlier travel narratives, An Inland Voyage and Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes. indicate a process of authorial self-construction at work that anticipates the 'modern self' of the Gothic fiction.

    The Europe of An Inland Voyage and Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes is largely the Europe of the peasantry, as Stevenson's documented journeys take him into rural byways and (in the case of the former, waterways).

    Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes. however, offers a less than flattering self-portrait of the Romantic wanderer.

    The two books by Robert Louis Stevenson that I wish to focus on here are among his earliest published works: An Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes (1879).

    Inland Voyage / Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes / The Silverado Squatters.

    Source:

    encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com

    Книга: Stevenson Robert Louis

    Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - To equip so small a book with a preface is, I am half afraid, to sin against proportion. But a preface is more than an author can resist, for it is the reward of his labours. When the foundation stone is laid, the architect appears with his plans, and struts for an hour before the public eye. So with the writer in his preface: he may have never a word to say, but he must show himself for a moment in the portico, hat in hand, and with an urbane demeanour. It is best, in such circumstances, to represent a delicate shade of manner between humility and superiority: as if the book had been written by some one else, and you had merely run over it and inserted what was good. But for my part I have not yet learned the trick to that perfection; I am not yet able to dissemble the warmth of my sentiments towards a.

    Stevenson, Robert Louis

    born Nov. 13, 1850, Edinburgh

    died Dec. 3, 1894, Vailima, Samoa

    Scottish essayist, poet, and author of fiction and travel books, best known for his novels Treasure Island (1881), Kidnapped (1886), Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), and The Master of Ballantrae (1889). Stevenson's biography of Pierre-Jean de Béranger appeared in the ninth edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (see the Britannica Classic: Pierre-Jean de Béranger).

    Stevenson was the only son of Thomas Stevenson, a prosperous civil engineer, and his wife, Margaret Isabella Balfour. His poor health made regular schooling difficult, but he attended Edinburgh Academy and other schools before, at 17, entering Edinburgh University, where he was expected to prepare himself for the family profession of lighthouse engineering. But Stevenson had no desire to be an engineer, and he eventually agreed with his father, as a compromise, to prepare instead for the Scottish bar.

    He had shown a desire to write early in life, and once in his teens he had deliberately set out to learn the writer's craft by imitating a great variety of models in prose and verse. His youthful enthusiasm for the Covenanters (Covenanter ) (i.e., those Scotsmen who banded together to defend their version of Presbyterianism in the 17th century) led to his writing The Pentland Rising, his first printed work. During his years at the university he rebelled against his parents' religion and set himself up as a liberal bohemian who abhorred the alleged cruelties and hypocrisies of bourgeois respectability.

    In 1873, in the midst of painful differences with his father, he visited a married cousin in Suffolk, England, where he met Sidney Colvin, the English scholar, who became a lifelong friend, and Fanny Sitwell (who later married Colvin). Sitwell, an older woman of charm and talent, drew the young man out and won his confidence. Soon Stevenson was deeply in love, and on his return to Edinburgh he wrote her a series of letters in which he played the part first of lover, then of worshipper, then of son. One of the several names by which Stevenson addressed her in these letters was “Claire,” a fact that many years after his death was to give rise to the erroneous notion that Stevenson had had an affair with a humbly born Edinburgh girl of that name. Eventually the passion turned into a lasting friendship.

    Later in 1873 Stevenson suffered severe respiratory illness and was sent to the French Riviera, where Colvin later joined him. He returned home the following spring. In July 1875 he was called to the Scottish bar, but he never practiced. Stevenson was frequently abroad, most often in France. Two of his journeys produced An Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes (1879). His career as a writer developed slowly. His essay “Roads” appeared in the Portfolio in 1873, and in 1874 “Ordered South” appeared in Macmillan 's Magazine, a review of Lord Lytton's Fables in Song appeared in the Fortnightly , and his first contribution (on Victor Hugo) appeared in The Cornhill Magazine, then edited by Leslie Stephen, a critic and biographer. It was these early essays, carefully wrought, quizzically meditative in tone, and unusual in sensibility, that first drew attention to Stevenson as a writer.

    Stephen brought Stevenson into contact with Edmund Gosse, the poet and critic, who became a good friend. Later, when in Edinburgh, Stephen introduced Stevenson to the writer W.E. Henley (Henley, William Ernest ). The two became warm friends and were to remain so until 1888, when a letter from Henley to Stevenson containing a deliberately implied accusation of dishonesty against the latter's wife precipitated a quarrel that Henley, jealous and embittered, perpetuated after his friend's death in a venomous review of a biography of Stevenson.

    In 1876 Stevenson met Fanny Vandegrift Osbourne, an American lady separated from her husband, and the two fell in love. Stevenson's parents' horror at their son's involvement with a married woman subsided somewhat when she returned to California in 1878, but it revived with greater force when Stevenson decided to join her in August 1879. Stevenson reached California ill and penniless (the record of his arduous journey appeared later in The Amateur Emigrant, 1895, and Across the Plains, 1892). His adventures, which included coming very near death and eking out a precarious living in Monterey and San Francisco, culminated in marriage to Fanny Osbourne (who was by then divorced from her first husband) early in 1880. About the same time a telegram from his relenting father offered much-needed financial support, and after a honeymoon by an abandoned silver mine (recorded in The Silverado Squatters, 1883) the couple sailed for Scotland to achieve reconciliation with the Thomas Stevensons.

    Soon after his return, Stevenson, accompanied by his wife and his stepson, Lloyd Osbourne, went, on medical advice (he had tuberculosis), to Davos, Switz. The family left there in April 1881 and spent the summer in Pitlochry and then in Braemar, Scot. There, in spite of bouts of illness, Stevenson embarked on Treasure Island (begun as a game with Lloyd), which started as a serial in Young Folks, under the title The Sea-Cook, in October 1881. Stevenson finished the story in Davos, to which he had returned in the autumn, and then started on Prince Otto (1885), a more complex but less successful work. Treasure Island is an adventure presented with consummate skill, with atmosphere, character, and action superbly geared to one another. The book is at once a gripping adventure tale and a wry comment on the ambiguity of human motives.

    In 1881 Stevenson published Virginibus Puerisque , his first collection of essays, most of which had appeared in The Cornhill. The winter of 1881 he spent at a chalet in Davos. In April 1882 he left Davos; but a stay in the Scottish Highlands, while it resulted in two of his finest short stories, “Thrawn Janet” and “The Merry Men,” produced lung hemorrhages, and in September he went to the south of France. There the Stevensons finally settled at a house in Hyères, where, in spite of intermittent illness, Stevenson was happy and worked well. He revised Prince Otto, worked on A Child's Garden of Verses (first called Penny Whistles ), and began The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses (1888), a historical adventure tale deliberately written in anachronistic language.

    The threat of a cholera epidemic drove the Stevensons from Hyères back to England. They lived at Bournemouth from September 1884 until July 1887, but his frequent bouts of dangerous illness proved conclusively that the British climate, even in the south of England, was not for him. The Bournemouth years were fruitful, however. There he got to know and love the American novelist Henry James. There he revised A Child's Garden (first published in 1885) and wrote “Markheim,” Kidnapped , and Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The poems in A Child's Garden represent with extraordinary fidelity an adult's recapturing of the emotions and sensations of childhood (children's literature); there is nothing quite like them in English literature. In Kidnapped the fruit of his researches into 18th-century Scottish history and of his feeling for Scottish landscape, history, character, and local atmosphere mutually illuminate one another. But it was Dr.Jekyll —both moral allegory and thriller—that established his reputation with the ordinary reader.

    In August 1887, still in search of health, Stevenson set out for America with his wife, mother, and stepson. On arriving in New York, he found himself famous, with editors and publishers offering lucrative contracts. He stayed for a while in the Adirondack Mountains, where he wrote essays for Scribner's and began The Master of Ballantrae. This novel, another exploration of moral ambiguities, contains some of his most impressive writing, although marred by its contrived conclusion.

    In June 1888 Stevenson, accompanied by his family, sailed from San Francisco in the schooner yacht Casco, which he had chartered, on what was intended to be an excursion for health and pleasure. In fact, he was to spend the rest of his life in the South Seas. They went first to the Marquesas Islands, then to Fakarava Atoll, then to Tahiti, then to Honolulu, where they stayed nearly six months, leaving in June 1889 for the Gilbert Islands, and then to Samoa, where he spent six weeks.

    During his months of wandering around the South Sea islands, Stevenson made intensive efforts to understand the local scene and the inhabitants. As a result, his writings on the South Seas (In the South Seas, 1896; A Footnote to History, 1892) are admirably pungent and perceptive. He was writing first-rate journalism, deepened by the awareness of landscape and atmosphere, such as that so notably rendered in his description of the first landfall at Nuku Hiva in the Marquesas.

    In October 1890 he returned to Samoa from a voyage to Sydney and established himself and his family in patriarchal status at Vailima, his house in Samoa. The climate suited him; he led an industrious and active life; and, when he died suddenly, it was of a cerebral hemorrhage, not of the long-feared tuberculosis. His work during those years was moving toward a new maturity. While Catriona (U.S. title, David Balfour, 1893) marked no advance in technique or imaginative scope on Kidnapped , to which it is a sequel, The Ebb-Tide (1894), a grim and powerful tale written in a dispassionate style (it was a complete reworking of a first draft by Lloyd Osbourne), showed that Stevenson had reached an important transition in his literary career. The next phase was demonstrated triumphantly in Weir of Hermiston (1896), the unfinished masterpiece on which he was working on the day of his death. “The Beach of Falesá” (first published 1892; included in Island Night's Entertainments, 1893), a story with a finely wrought tragic texture, as well as the first part of The Master of Ballantrae, pointed in this direction, but neither approaches Weir . Stevenson achieved in this work a remarkable richness of tragic texture in a style stripped of all superfluities. The dialogue contains some of the best Scots prose in modern literature. Fragment though it is, Weir of Hermiston stands as a great work and Stevenson's masterpiece.

    Stevenson was an indefatigable letter writer, and his letters (edited by Sidney Colvin in 1899) provide a lively and enchanting picture of the man and his life. But Colvin omitted many of the most interesting letters and compressed and dovetailed others, with the result that many important facts about Stevenson's emotional life remained unknown until the true text of all the letters was available. Colvin presented Stevenson's letters to Fanny Sitwell to what is now the National Library of Scotland with the proviso that they were not to be opened until 1949; the revealing and often fascinating letters to Charles Baxter, a friend, were deposited in the Yale University Library. Stevenson's biography suffered from his being early canonized; later writers built up a counterpicture of an immoral swaggerer restrained into reluctant respectability by a jealous wife. Access to the crucial letters yielded a picture of a Stevenson who was neither the “seraph in chocolate” against whom Henley protested nor a low-living rake nor an optimistic escapist nor the happy invalid but a sensitive and intelligent writer who had no illusions about life and wryly made the best of a world to which he did not profess to have the key.

    Stevenson's literary reputation has also fluctuated. The reaction against him set in soon after his death: he was considered a mannered and imitative essayist or only a writer of children's books. But eventually the pendulum began to swing the other way, and by the 1950s his reputation was established among the more discerning as a writer of originality and power; whose essays at their best are cogent and perceptive renderings of aspects of the human condition; whose novels are either brilliant adventure stories with subtle moral overtones or original and impressive presentations of human action in terms of history and topography as well as psychology; whose short stories produce some new and effective permutations in the relation between romance and irony or manage to combine horror and suspense with moral diagnosis; whose poems, though not showing the highest poetic genius, are often skillful, occasionally (in his use of Scots, for example) interesting and original, and sometimes (in A Child's Garden ) valuable for their exhibition of a special kind of sensibility.

    New Arabian Nights, 2 vol. (1882; the stories in vol. 1 appeared as Latter-Day Arabian Nights, 1878; those in vol. 2 had appeared in The Cornhill and other magazines); Treasure Island (1883; serialized in a slightly different form in Young Folks, 1881–82); More New Arabian Nights, with Fanny Van de Grift Stevenson (1885); Prince Otto (1885); Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886); Kidnapped (1886; in Young Folks, 1886); TheMerry Men and Other Tales and Fables (1887), including “Thrawn Janet” and “Olalla”; The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses (1888; in Young Folks, 1883); The Master of Ballantrae (1889; serialized in Scribner's Magazine, 1888–89); Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped ; The Ebb-Tide, with Lloyd Osbourne (1894; serialized in To-Day, 1893–94); Weir of Hermiston (unfinished 1896); St. Ives, completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, pseudonym “Q” (1897).

    Essays and miscellaneous.

    An Inland Voyage (1878); Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes (1879); Virginibus Puerisque (1881), collected essays, mainly from The Cornhill Magazine; Familiar Studies of Men and Books (1882); Memories and Portraits (1887), 16 essays; Across the Plains (1892), 12 essays; Vailima Letters, to Sidney Colvin (1895); From Scotland to Silverado, ed. by J.D. Hart (1966), brings together all Stevenson's previously published and unpublished writings about his trip to California in 1879–80.

    A Child's Garden of Verses (1885); Underwoods (1887), 38 poems in English, 16 in Scots; Ballads (1890); Songs of Travel and Other Verses (1896). Collected Poems, ed. by J. Adam Smith, 2nd ed. (1971), is the standard edition of Stevenson's poetry.

    Bibliographies of works by and about Stevenson include William F. Prideaux, A Bibliography of the Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, rev. by F.V. Livingston (1917, reprinted 1968); and George L. McKay (comp .), A Stevenson Library..., Formed by Edwin J. Beinecke, 6 vol. (1951–64).Of the many collected editions of Stevenson's works the following are notable: Pentland edition, ed. by Edmund Gosse, 20 vol. (1906–07); Swanston edition, 25 vol. (1911–12); Vailima edition, ed. by Lloyd Osbourne, with prefatory notes by Fanny Van de Grift Stevenson, 26 vol. (1922–23, reprinted 1974); Skerryvore edition, 30 vol. (1924–26); Tusitala edition, 35 vol. (1923–24); South Seas edition, 32 vol. (1925). James D. Hart (ed .), From Scotland to Silverado (1966), brings together all of Stevenson's previously published and unpublished writings about his trip to California in 1879–80, with a biographical introduction.The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson to His Family and Friends were edited by Sidney Colvin (2 vol. 1899; 4 vol. 1911, reprinted 1969), but these are far from complete, and the text has sometimes been tampered with. Stevenson's lively and important correspondence with his lifelong friend Charles Baxter, RLS: Stevenson's Letters to Charles Baer, was edited by De Lancey Ferguson and Marshall Waingrow (1956).The official biography of Stevenson is by his cousin Graham Balfour, The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson, 2 vol. (1901, reprinted 1968). This is valuable, but there are serious omissions and evasions. The standard modern biography is Joseph C. Furnas, Voyage to Windward: The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson (1951, reprinted 1980). Malcolm Elwin, The Strange Case of Robert Louis Stevenson (1950, reprinted 1971); Richard Aldington, Portrait of a Rebel (1957); and David Daiches, Robert Louis Stevenson and His World (1974), are lively retellings of the life. Jenni Calder, Robert Louis Stevenson. A Life Study (1980), explores and explains a man and a writer. Henry James and Robert Louis Stevenson: A Record of Friendship and Criticism, ed. by J. Adam Smith (1948), gives an account of the relationship between the two writers and prints both their criticisms of each other's work and their letters to each other.Critical works on Stevenson are David Daiches, Robert Louis Stevenson (1946); Lettice Cooper, Robert Louis Stevenson (1947); Robert Kiely, Robert Louis Stevenson and the Fiction of Adventure (1964); and Edwin M. Eigner, Robert Louis Stevenson and Romantic Tradition (1966). Paul Maixner (ed .), Robert Louis Stevenson. The Critical Heritage (1981), presents reviews and critical assessments from 1878 to 1924 that represent the debate on Stevenson's reputation.

    An Inland Voyage — (1878) is a travelogue by Robert Louis Stevenson about a canoeing trip through France and Belgium in 1876. It is Stevenson s earliest book and a pioneering work of outdoor literature.As a young man, Stevenson desired to be financially independent … Wikipedia

    Voyage avec un ane dans les Cevennes — Voyage avec un âne dans les Cévennes Illustration de Walter Crane Voyage avec un âne dans les Cévennes ou parfois Voyage en Cévennes avec un âne (Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes) est un récit de voyage de Robert Louis Stevenson paru en juin … Wikipédia en Français

    Voyage avec un âne dans les cévennes — Illustration de Walter Crane Voyage avec un âne dans les Cévennes ou parfois Voyage en Cévennes avec un âne (Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes) est un récit de voyage de Robert Louis Stevenson paru en juin 1879. L écrivain … Wikipédia en Français

    Voyage en Cévennes avec un âne — Voyage avec un âne dans les Cévennes Illustration de Walter Crane Voyage avec un âne dans les Cévennes ou parfois Voyage en Cévennes avec un âne (Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes) est un récit de voyage de Robert Louis Stevenson paru en juin … Wikipédia en Français

    Voyage en canoë sur les rivières du Nord — Frontispice de Walter Crane Voyage en canoë sur les rivières du Nord (An Inland Voyage) est un récit de voyage de l écrivain écossais Robert Louis Stevenson publié en 1878. Synopsis … Wikipédia en Français

    Voyage du commodore Anson — En 1740, pendant la guerre de l’oreille de Jenkins qui opposa la Grande Bretagne et l’Espagne de 1739 à 1748, le Commodore George Anson reçut du roi Georges II le commandement d’une escadre, avec la mission d’aller harceler les colonies… … Wikipédia en Français

    Inland marine insurance — indemnifies loss to moving or movable property and is an outgrowth of ocean marine insurance. Historically, ocean marine insurance held the transporter responsible for property loss before, during, and after the completion of the voyage. In the… … Wikipedia

    Voyage du Commodore Anson — En 1740, pendant la guerre de l’oreille de Jenkins qui opposa la Grande Bretagne et l’Espagne de 1739 à 1748, le Commodore George Anson reçut du roi Georges II le commandement d’une escadre, avec la mission d’aller harceler les colonies… … Wikipédia en Français

    Second voyage of HMS Beagle — The second voyage of HMS Beagle from 27 December 1831 to 2 October 1836 was the second survey expedition of HMS Beagle. under captain Robert FitzRoy who had taken over command of the ship on its first voyage after her previous captain committed… … Wikipedia

    George Anson's voyage around the world — While Great Britain was at war with Spain in 1740, Commodore George Anson led a squadron of eight ships on a mission to disrupt or capture Spain s Pacific possessions. Returning to England in 1744 by way of China and thus completing a… … Wikipedia

    Source:

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    The Annotated Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes

    The Annotated 'Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes'/Background

    Robert Louis Stevenson, 1879

    Robert Louis Stevenson was 28 years old in the summer of 1878, recently out of law school, living in France as a struggling and unestablished author, he had yet to write the books that would make him famous - Treasure Island . Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde . His future career as a writer was far from assured, having only published one travel book, An Inland Voyage . and a few essays. Stevenson's unconventional bohemian lifestyle matched his daringly long hair and eccentric appearance, much to the chagrin and worry of his conservative parents in Scotland who were still supporting him financially.

    Stevenson had recently met and fell in love with an American woman in Paris, 10 years his elder, named Fanny Osbourne. although she was still technically married to a husband in San Francisco. Late that summer she returned home to California and Stevenson was unsure of what to do next; needing money to become financially independent from his parents, and chase after the woman he loved, he headed into the hills of southern France to gain travel experience, reflect on this cross-roads in life, escape from the pain of separation from Fanny, and write a book about it.

    Stevenson enjoyed traveling, adventure, and the outdoors, a trait inheritance from his sea-faring family, but he had also been sickly much of his life with lung problems. The 12-day solo hiking trip through the Cevennes mountains in the south of France would be, up to that point in his life, the greatest adventure he had ever undertaken, an opportunity to leave the cloistered life of school and the sick-bed for the wide open out of doors.

    In the genre of Outdoor literature. Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes is considered an early pioneering classic. Not only is it one of the earliest portrayals of traveling in the out of doors for pleasure as a vacation, it also describes the commissioning of one of the first sleeping bags; of Stevenson's own design and idea, it was made by local villagers with sewn together sheep skins (wool-side in), forming what he called a "sleeping sack". Although much larger and heavier than modern sleeping bags (he would need a Donkey to carry it), it would prove to be influential.

    Stevenson grew up reading stories of the Covenanters of Scotland, Protestant rebel bands who fought in a number of Scottish civil wars in the 17th century. So it was natural that he would similarly be interested in the story of the Camisards of France, bands of Protestant rebels who in the early 18th century conducted a successful 2-year unconventional military campaign against the royalist forces of the King of France. In particular, Stevenson was drawn to the story of the main rebel leader Jean Cavalier. a legendary folk hero. It was part of Stevenson's greater goal to eventually write historical fiction about Scotland that would help unify it as a separate nation, and he eventually did just that with his famous novel Kidnapped ; Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes can be seen as the young Stevenson honing his skills to that end.

    Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes is one of Stevenson's earliest works and, as one critic said of it, a highly "filigreed " (ornamental) work. There are passages of French prose; references to historical people, places and events; a vocabulary that includes not only some now-archaic Victorian words, but Scottish and ecclesiastical; and allusions to literary and biblical passages.

    Stevenson includes mottoes (short poems between chapters) that he attributes to fictional authors or plays, but which he actually wrote himself. In a letter to his friend William Henley in March 1879 Stevenson explained his reasoning, saying "I can't get mottoes for some of my sections and took to making them [myself]; for I wish rather to have the precise sense than very elegant verses". Sir Walter Scott had employed similar techniques.

    Stevenson's memoir of his 12 day excursion in 1878 remains popular to this day. The chapter "A Night Among The Pines" contains some of the most beautiful descriptions of the out of doors. There is a tourist industry in the Cévennes region that caters to hikers who re-trace Stevenson's route on an established GR-70 trail. There are even Donkey-rental companies for those wishing to hike with a Donkey.

    • Robert Louis Stevenson GR70 - detailed town by town descriptions of Stevenson's route. French and some English. Pictures and maps.
    • Association 'Sur le Chemin de Robert Louis Stevenson'. another trail map and pictures. Organized by tourism professionals interesting in promoting the trail.
    • Camisard timeline. in French with a Google-English translation.
    • Camisards. extensive site about the Camisards, in French with Google-English translation.

    From Narrating Scotland: The Imagination Of Robert Louis Stevenson by Barry Menikoff.

    Stevenson used a number of sources in writing the book. He spent time at the Advocates' Library in Edinburgh, and we still have his reading list to know which books he used.

    • A Complete History of the Cevennes (1703)
    • the English editions of Jean Cavalier's Memoirs of the War of the Cevennes. 2nd ed 1727
    • A Cry from the Desart; or Testimonials of the Miraculous Things Come to Pass in the Cevennes. 2nd ed trans with an introduction by John Lacy (1707); which is a translation of François M. Misson's Le Theatre des Cevennes (1707);
    • Antoine Court's Histoire des Troubles de Cevennes (1760);
    • David Augustin de Brueys's Histoire du Fanatisme (1692).
    • Napoléon Peyrat (1809-1881), a French historian who wrote Histoire des Pasteurs du Desert depuis révocation de l'édit de Nantes jusqu'à la Révolution française, 1685-1789 (1842), which includes the history of the Protestant insurrection in France between 1765 and 1789.

    His favorite book was Cavalier's Memories. although he remarked, in the library copy which he marked up, "I fear [the memoirs] are to be taken with a very large allowance".

    Sources used in creating this annotated version.

    Most of the annotations were originally sourced using Wikipedia, Wiktionary, Google, the Oxford English Dictionary, and various other online sources. Other sources consulted include:

    • Bowman, James Cloyd, ed. (1918). An Inland Voyage and Travels with a Donkey. Some helpful notes.
    • Dumas, Alexandre. Massacres of the South . Chapters II through V is an entertaining history of the war of the Camisards by one of the greatest 19th C novelists.
    • Golding, Gordon, ed. (1979). The Cévennes Journal: Notes on a Journey through the French Highlands. This is the actual journal that Stevenson wrote during the trip and contains numerous differences from the published edition. The Christopher MacLachlan edition contains differences between the two in the end notes. ISBN 0800814142
    • Hammerton, J.A. (1907). In the Track of R. L. Stevenson . Hammerton follows Stevenson's footsteps via bicycle in 1903, about 25 years later. Includes many photographs.
    • MacLachlan, Christopher (2004). Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes and The Amateur Emigrant. ISBN 0141439467 - excellent introduction and helpful notes.
    • Christopher Rush (2005). To Travel Hopefully. ISBN 186197793X - Personal memoir by Scottish novelist re-tracing Stevenson's journey.
    • Hillary Macaskill and Molly Wood (2006). Downhill All The Way: Walking with donkeys on the Stevenon Trail. Travel literature by two British ladies who travel the trail in stages offering a modern perspective of the trail.
    • Sabine Baring-Gould (1907). A Book of the Cévennes . early car journey through the mountains, with photos of places Stevenson went and quotes from Travels with a Donkey .
    The Annotated 'Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes' '

    Source:

    en.wikisource.org

    An Inland Voyage

    An Inland Voyage

    Canal barges in Belgium. "Frontispiece" by J.B. Carrington 1878 (see "References" below for more images from the book)

    An Inland Voyage (1878) is a travelogue by Robert Louis Stevenson about a canoeing trip through France and Belgium in 1876. It is Stevenson's earliest book and a pioneering work of outdoor literature .

    As a young man, Stevenson desired to be financially independent so that he might pursue the woman he loved, and set about funding his freedom from parental support by writing travelogues, the three most prominent being An Inland Voyage. Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes (1879) and The Silverado Squatters (1883).

    Voyage was undertaken with Stevenson's Scottish friend Sir Walter Grindlay Simpson, mostly along the Oise River from Belgium through France, in the Fall of 1876 when Stevenson was 26 years old. The first part, in Belgium, passed through heavily industrial areas and many canal locks, proving to be not much of a vacation. They then went by rail to France, starting downriver at Maubeuge and ending at Pontoise. close to the Seine. The route itinerary has become a popular route for modern travelers to re-enact with guidebooks and maps available.

    Stevenson (named "Arethusa" in the book after his canoe) and Simpson (called "Cigarette" along with his canoe) each had a wooden canoe rigged with a sail, comparable in style to a modern kayak. known as a "Rob Roy". They were narrow, decked, and paddled with double-bladed paddles, a style that had recently become popular in England, France, and neighboring countries, inspired by Scottish explorer John MacGregor 's book A Thousand Miles in the Rob Roy Canoe (1866).

    Outdoor travel for leisure was unusual for the time, and the two Scotsmen were often mistaken for lowly traveling salesman (a status that more than once kept them from a room for the night), but the novelty of their canoes would occasion entire villages to come out and wave along the banks with cheers of "come back soon!" A fundamentally Romantic work in style and tone, the book paints a delightful atmosphere of Europe in a more innocent time, with quirky innkeepers, traveling entertainers and puppeteers, old men who had never left their villages, ramshackle military units parading with drums and swords, and gypsy -like families who lived on canal barges.

    The first edition was published by C. Kegan Paul & Co. Since then there have been several editions; a later edition adds an adventure on foot in which Stevenson is thought to be a beggar and is tossed in jail by police, and also a preface by Stevenson's future wife Fanny Vandegrift Osbourne and stepson Lloyd Osbourne. who met him on this journey.

    References

    Source:

    en.rfwiki.org

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