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Made In Canada, Read In Spain: Essays On The Translation And Circulation Of English-Canadian Literature - Isbn:9788376560175

  • Book Title: Made in Canada, Read in Spain: Essays on the Translation and Circulation of English-Canadian Literature
  • ISBN 13: 9788376560175
  • ISBN 10: 8376560174
  • Author: Pilar Somacarrera
  • Category: Literary Collections
  • Category (general): Literary Collections
  • Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
  • Format & Number of pages: 231 pages, book
  • Synopsis: In the same article, Antolín Rato disdained Microserfs as merely a disparagement of computer fanatics. Triggered by the success of the earlier novels and by its innovative technological content, Microserfs (Ediciones B, 1996) had appeared in  ...

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Project MUSE - Made in Canada, Read in Spain: Essays on the Translation and Circulation of English-Canadian Literatureed

Pilar Somacarrera (ed.), Made in Canada, Read in Spain: Essays on the Translation and Circulation of English-Canadian Literature (Berlin: de Gruyter/Versita, 2013, 231pp. Open Access. Cased. €89.95. ISBN 978-83-7656-017-5.

This essay collection by seven Spanish Canadianists offers a new international perspective on Anglo-Canadian literature, reviewing it as a cultural product in the globalised context of publishing and marketing, as Somacarrera’s ‘Introduction’ makes clear: ‘The overall objective of this collection is to assess the transference, reception and promotion of CanLit in translation in Spain and to determine its impact’ (p. 11). This is an important book, not only for its detailed analysis of the Spanish case, but also for the way it stimulates our thinking about why certain texts and authors from other literatures are selected for promotion and teaching in a different national context and the respective roles played by institutions, critics and reviewers, academics, social media, and last but not least, literary prizes.

The book is divided into four sections. The first two analyse the social, ideological, [End Page 283] and economic coordinates of cultural transfer, together with issues around translation, Canada’s national branding as ‘multicultural’ and ‘cosmopolitan’, and Catalonia’s affinities with Quebec, both with minority linguistic and cultural identities. The second half of the book focuses on three of the most popular Canadian authors in translation, predictably Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro and, perhaps surprisingly, Douglas Coupland, whose Generation X influenced a generation of dissident young Spanish writers in the 1990s (though generally he was seen as ‘American’ and not Canadian). In her essay ‘Translation, Nation Branding and Indo-chic’, Bélen Martin-Lucas explains that the small group of South Asian Canadian writers in translation are seen by Spanish readers as ‘Indian’ rather than as products of Canadian multiculturalism. Interestingly, Michael Ondaatje, most of whose novels have been translated since The English Patient won the Booker Prize and was adapted into film, has ‘become Canadian in Spain’ (p. 85) only since Atwood won the prestigious Prince of Asturias Prize in 2008. Though many of these essays stress the value of the Canada Council’s International Translation Grants programme, they also make the point that translation is pre-eminently a financial investment for publishers, who prefer authors who are already internationally celebrated, a reminder that there are always gaps to be negotiated between cultural and economic interests. The final essay, by Eva Darias-Beautell, is the only one not about translation but about a different method for promoting CanLit: ‘Home Truths. Teaching Canadian Literatures [in English] in Spanish Universities’, which began in the early 1990s. As a critical overview of courses and teaching methodologies, it displays a profound anxiety (felt not only in Spain) about survival within changing institutional frameworks and Canadian government funding cuts to international Canadian Studies programmes. Here at the end, the real agenda of this book is revealed as political, economic, and academic interests come together, for university teachers, like translators, are significant if unacknowledged agents ‘of vital importance in the context of the globalization of cultural markets’ (p. 10). These Home Truths ought to be worth serious consideration by Canada’s policy makers.

Coral Ann Howells

University of London/University of Reading

Copyright © 2015 British Association for Canadian Studies


The Stories That Are Great Within Us: ‘Toronto Stories’ ed. by Barry Callaghan (review)


In the Interval of the Wave: Prince Edward Island Women’s Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Life Writing by Mary McDonald-Rissanen (review)


Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture: Canadian Periodicals in English and French, 1925–1960 by Faye Hammill and Michelle Smith (review)

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Articles

Made in Canada, Read in Spain

Made in Canada, Read in Spain Aims and Scope

Made in Canada, Read in Spain is an edited collection of essays on the impact, diffusion, and translation of English Canadian literature in Spain. Given the size of the world’s Spanish-speaking population (some 350 million people) and the importance of the Spanish language in global publishing, it appeals to publishers, cultural agents and translators, as well as to Canadianists and Translation Studies scholars. By analyzing more than 100 sources of online and print reviews, this volume covers a wide-range of areas and offers an ambitious scope that goes from the institutional side of the Spanish-Anglo-Canadian exchange to issues on the insertion of CanLit in the Spanish curriculum; from ‘nation branding’, translation, and circulation of Canadian authors in autonomous communities (such as Catalonia) to the official acknowledgement of some authors by the Spanish literary system -Margaret Atwood and Leonard Cohen were awarded the prestigious Prince of Asturias prize in 2008 and 2011, respectively.

Details

231 pages DE GRUYTER OPEN Language: English Type of Publication: Monograph

MARC record More.

Pilar Somacarrera is Associate Professor at the UAM (Madrid, Spain). She is a specialist in Postcolonial Literatures in English.

Source:

www.degruyter.com

Alice Munro - Wikipedia, Photos and Videos

WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

Alice Ann Munro ( / ˈ æ l ᵻ s ˌ æ n m ʌ n ˈ r oʊ /. néeLaidlaw / ˈ l eɪ d l ɔː / ; born 10 July 1931) is a Canadian short story writer and Nobel Prize winner. Munro's work has been described as having revolutionized the architecture of short stories, especially in its tendency to move forward and backward in time. [2] Her stories have been said to "embed more than announce, reveal more than parade." [3]

Munro's fiction is most often set in her native Huron County in southwestern Ontario. [4] Her stories explore human complexities in an uncomplicated prose style. [5] Munro's writing has established her as "one of our greatest contemporary writers of fiction," or, as Cynthia Ozick put it, "our Chekhov ." [6] Munro is the recipient of many literary accolades, including the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature for her work as "master of the contemporary short story", [7] and the 2009 Man Booker International Prize for her lifetime body of work. She is also a three-time winner of Canada's Governor General's Award for fiction and was the recipient of the Writers' Trust of Canada 's 1996 Marian Engel Award. as well as the 2004 Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize for Runaway . [7] [8] [9] [10]

Contents Life and work [ edit ] Early life [ edit ]

Munro was born Alice Ann Laidlaw in Wingham, Ontario. Her father, Robert Eric Laidlaw, was a fox and mink farmer, [11] and later turned to turkey farming. [12] Her mother, Anne Clarke Laidlaw (née Chamney), was a schoolteacher. Munro began writing as a teenager, publishing her first story, "The Dimensions of a Shadow", in 1950 while studying English and journalism at the University of Western Ontario under a two-year scholarship. [13] [14] During this period she worked as a waitress, a tobacco picker, and a library clerk. In 1951, she left the university, where she had been majoring in English since 1949, to marry fellow student James Munro. They moved to Dundarave, West Vancouver. for James's job in a department store. In 1963, the couple moved to Victoria. where they opened Munro's Books. which still operates.

Career [ edit ]

Munro's highly acclaimed first collection of stories, Dance of the Happy Shades (1968), won the Governor General's Award. then Canada's highest literary prize. [15] That success was followed by Lives of Girls and Women (1971), a collection of interlinked stories. In 1978, Munro's collection of interlinked stories Who Do You Think You Are? was published (titled The Beggar Maid: Stories of Flo and Rose in the United States). This book earned Munro a second Governor General's Literary Award. [16] From 1979 to 1982, she toured Australia, China and Scandinavia for public appearances and readings. In 1980 Munro held the position of writer in residence at both the University of British Columbia and the University of Queensland. In 2006, Munro's story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" was adapted for the screen and directed by Sarah Polley as Away from Her . starring Julie Christie and Gordon Pinsent .

Since the 1980s, Munro has published a short-story collection at least once every four years, most recently in 2001, 2004, 2006, 2009, and 2012. First versions of Munro's stories have appeared in journals such as The New Yorker . The Atlantic Monthly . Grand Street . Harper's Magazine . Mademoiselle . and The Paris Review . Her collections have been translated into thirteen languages. [1] On 10 October 2013, Munro was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. cited as a "master of the contemporary short story". [7] [8] [17] She is the first Canadian and the 13th woman to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature. [18]

Munro is noted for her longtime association with editor and publisher Douglas Gibson. [19] When Gibson left Macmillan of Canada in 1986 to launch his own Douglas Gibson Books imprint at McClelland and Stewart. Munro returned the advance that Macmillan had already paid her for The Progress of Love so that she could follow Gibson to the new company. [20] Munro and Gibson have retained their professional association ever since; when Gibson published his own memoirs in 2011, Munro wrote the introduction, and to this day Gibson often makes public appearances on Munro's behalf when her health prevents her from appearing personally. [21]

Almost twenty of Munro's works have been made available for free on the web. However, in most cases these are the first versions only. [22] From the period before 2003, 16 stories have been included in Munro's own compilations more than twice, with two of her works scoring even four republications: "Carried Away" and "Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage". [23]

Writing [ edit ]

Many of Munro's stories are set in Huron County, Ontario. Her strong regional focus is one of the features of her fiction. Another is the omniscient narrator who serves to make sense of the world. Many compare Munro's small-town settings to writers from the rural South of the United States. As in the works of William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor. her characters often confront deep-rooted customs and traditions, but the reaction of Munro's characters is generally less intense than their Southern counterparts'. Her male characters tend to capture the essence of the everyman. while her female characters are more complex. Much of Munro's work exemplifies the literary genre known as Southern Ontario Gothic. [24]

Munro's work is often compared with the great short-story writers. In her stories, as in Chekhov's, plot is secondary and "little happens." As with Chekhov, Garan Holcombe notes: "All is based on the epiphanic moment. the sudden enlightenment, the concise, subtle, revelatory detail." Munro's work deals with "love and work, and the failings of both. She shares Chekhov's obsession with time and our much-lamented inability to delay or prevent its relentless movement forward." [25]

A frequent theme of her work, particularly evident in her early stories, has been the dilemmas of a girl coming of age and coming to terms with her family and the small town she grew up in. In recent work such as Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage (2001) and Runaway (2004) she has shifted her focus to the travails of middle age, of women alone, and of the elderly. It is a mark of her style for characters to experience a revelation that sheds light on, and gives meaning to, an event.

Munro's prose reveals the ambiguities of life: "ironic and serious at the same time," "mottoes of godliness and honor and flaming bigotry," "special, useless knowledge," "tones of shrill and happy outrage," "the bad taste, the heartlessness, the joy of it." Her style places the fantastic next to the ordinary, with each undercutting the other in ways that simply and effortlessly evoke life. [26] As Robert Thacker wrote:

Munro's writing creates. an empathetic union among readers, critics most apparent among them. We are drawn to her writing by its verisimilitude – not of mimesis. so-called and. 'realism ' – but rather the feeling of being itself. of just being a human being." [27]

Many critics have asserted that Munro's stories often have the emotional and literary depth of novels. Some have asked whether Munro actually writes short stories or novels. Alex Keegan, writing in Eclectica, gave a simple answer: "Who cares? In most Munro stories there is as much as in many novels." [28]

Research on Munro's work has been undertaken since the early 1970s, with the first PhD thesis published in 1972. [29] The first book-length volume collecting the papers presented at the University of Waterloo first conference on her oeuvre was published in 1984, The Art of Alice Munro: Saying the Unsayable. [30] In 2003/2004, the journal Open Letter. Canadian quarterly review of writing and sources published 14 contributions on Munro's work, in Autumn 2010 the Journal of the Short Story in English (JSSE)/Les cahiers de la nouvelle dedicated a special issue to Munro, and in May 2012 an issue of the journal Narrative focussed on a single story by Munro, "Passion" (2004), with an introduction, a summary of the story, and five essays of analysis. [31]

Creating new versions [ edit ]

Alice Munro publishes variant versions of her stories, sometimes within a short span of time. Her works "Save the Reaper" and "Passion" came out in two different versions in the same year, in 1998 and 2004 respectively. At the other end of the scale, two stories were republished in a variant version about 30 years later, "Home" (1974/2006) and "Wood" (1980/2009). [32]

Ann Close and Lisa Dickler Awano reported in 2006 that Munro had not wanted to reread the galleys of Runaway (2004): "No, because I’ll rewrite the stories." In their symposium contribution An Appreciation of Alice Munro they say that of her story "Powers", for example, Munro did eight versions in all. [33]

Section variants of "Wood".

Awano writes that "Wood" is a good example of how Munro, being "a tireless self-editor", [34] rewrites and revises a story, in this case returning to it for a second publication nearly thirty years later. In this case, Awano says, Munro revised characterizations, themes and perspectives, as well as rhythmic syllables, a conjunction or a punctuation mark. The characters change, too. Inferring from the perspective they take on things, they are middle-age in 1980, and in 2009 they are older. Awano perceives a heightened lyricism brought about not least by the poetic precision of the revision undertaken by the author. [34] The 2009 version is made up of eight sections instead of three in 1980, and it has a new ending. Awano writes that Munro literally "refinishes" the first take on the story, with an ambiguity that is characteristic of Munro’s endings, and that the author re-imagines her stories throughout her work a variety of ways. [34]

Several stories were re-published with considerable variation as to which content goes into which section. This can be seen, for example, in "Home", "The Progress of Love", "What Do You Want to Know For?", "The Children Stay", "Save the Reaper", "The Bear Came Over the Mountain", "Passion", "The View Fom Castle Rock", "Wenlock Edge", and "Deep-Holes".

Personal life [ edit ]

Munro married James Munro in 1951. Their daughters Sheila, Catherine, and Jenny were born in 1953, 1955, and 1957 respectively; Catherine died 15 hours after birth. [ citation needed ]

In 1963, the Munros moved to Victoria where they opened Munro's Books. a popular bookstore still in business. In 1966, their daughter Andrea was born. Alice and James Munro divorced in 1972.

Munro returned to Ontario to become writer in residence at the University of Western Ontario. and in 1976 received an honorary LLD from the institution. In 1976, she married Gerald Fremlin, a cartographer and geographer she met in her university days. [13] The couple moved to a farm outside Clinton, Ontario. and later to a house in Clinton, where Fremlin died on 17 April 2013, aged 88. [35] Munro and Fremlin also owned a home in Comox, British Columbia. [1]

At a Toronto appearance in October 2009, Munro indicated that she had received treatment for cancer and for a heart condition requiring coronary-artery bypass surgery. [36]

In 2002, her daughter Sheila Munro published a childhood memoir, Lives of Mothers and Daughters: Growing Up With Alice Munro. [37]

Works [ edit ] Original short-story collections [ edit ] Short-story compilations [ edit ]
  • Selected Stories (later retitled Selected Stories 1968-1994 ) – 1996
  • No Love Lost – 2003
  • Vintage Munro – 2004
  • Alice Munro's Best: A Selection of Stories – Toronto 2006/ Carried Away: A Selection of Stories – New York 2006; both with an introduction by Margaret Atwood
  • New Selected Stories – 2011
  • Lying Under the Apple Tree. New Selected Stories. 434 pages, 15 stories, [39] c Alice Munro 2011, Vintage, London 2014, ISBN 978-0-0995-9377-5 (paperback)
  • Family Furnishings: Selected Stories 1995-2014 - 2014
Selected awards and honours [ edit ]

Source:

www.mashpedia.com

Alice Munroとは - goo Wikipedia (ウィキペディア)

Alice Munro

Alice Ann Munro ( / ˈ æ l ᵻ s ˌ æ n m ʌ n ˈ r oʊ /. néeLaidlaw / ˈ l eɪ d l ɔː / ; born 10 July 1931) is a Canadian short story writer and Nobel Prize winner. Munro's work has been described as having revolutionized the architecture of short stories, especially in its tendency to move forward and backward in time. [2] Her stories have been said to "embed more than announce, reveal more than parade." [3]

Munro's fiction is most often set in her native Huron County in southwestern Ontario. [4] Her stories explore human complexities in an uncomplicated prose style. [5] Munro's writing has established her as "one of our greatest contemporary writers of fiction," or, as Cynthia Ozick put it, "our Chekhov ." [6] Munro is the recipient of many literary accolades, including the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature for her work as "master of the contemporary short story", [7] and the 2009 Man Booker International Prize for her lifetime body of work. She is also a three-time winner of Canada's Governor General's Award for fiction and was the recipient of the Writers' Trust of Canada 's 1996 Marian Engel Award. as well as the 2004 Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize for Runaway . [7] [8] [9] [10]

Contents Life and work [ edit ] Early life [ edit ]

Munro was born Alice Ann Laidlaw in Wingham, Ontario. Her mother, Robert Eric Laidlaw, was a fox and mink farmer, [11] and later turned to turkey farming. [12] Her mother, Anne Clarke Laidlaw (née Chamney), was a schoolteacher. Munro began writing as a teenager, publishing her first story, "The Dimensions of a Shadow", in 1950 while studying English and journalism at the University of Western Ontario under a two-year scholarship. [13] [14] During this period she worked as a waitress, a tobacco picker, and a library clerk. In 1951, she left the university, where she had been majoring in English since 1949, to marry fellow student James Munro. They moved to Dundarave, West Vancouver. for James's job in a department store. In 1963, the couple moved to Victoria. where they opened Munro's Books. which still operates.

Career [ edit ]

Munro's highly acclaimed first collection of stories, Dance of the Happy Shades (1968), won the Governor General's Award. then Canada's highest literary prize. [15] That success was followed by Lives of Girls and Women (1971), a collection of interlinked stories. In 1978, Munro's collection of interlinked stories Who Do You Think You Are? was published (titled The Beggar Maid: Stories of Flo and Rose in the United States). This book earned Munro a second Governor General's Literary Award. [16] From 1979 to 1982, she toured Australia, China and Scandinavia for public appearances and readings. In 1980 Munro held the position of writer in residence at both the University of British Columbia and the University of Queensland. In 2006, Munro's story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" was adapted for the screen and directed by Sarah Polley as Away from Her . starring Julie Christie and Gordon Pinsent .

Since the 1980s, Munro has published a short-story collection at least once every four years, most recently in 2001, 2004, 2006, 2009, and 2012. First versions of Munro's stories have appeared in journals such as The New Yorker . The Atlantic Monthly . Grand Street . Harper's Magazine . Mademoiselle . and The Paris Review . Her collections have been translated into thirteen languages. [1] On 10 October 2013, Munro was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. cited as a "master of the contemporary short story". [7] [8] [17] She is the first Canadian and the 13th woman to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature. [18]

Munro is noted for her longtime association with editor and publisher Douglas Gibson. [19] When Gibson left Macmillan of Canada in 1986 to launch his own Douglas Gibson Books imprint at McClelland and Stewart. Munro returned the advance that Macmillan had already paid her for The Progress of Love so that she could follow Gibson to the new company. [20] Munro and Gibson have retained their professional association ever since; when Gibson published his own memoirs in 2011, Munro wrote the introduction, and to this day Gibson often makes public appearances on Munro's behalf when her health prevents her from appearing personally. [21]

Almost twenty of Munro's works have been made available for free on the web. However, in most cases these are the first versions only. [22] From the period before 2003, 16 stories have been included in Munro's own compilations more than twice, with two of her works scoring even four republications: "Carried Away" and "Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage". [23]

Writing [ edit ]

Many of Munro's stories are set in Huron County, Ontario. Her strong regional focus is one of the features of her fiction. Another is the omniscient narrator who serves to make sense of the world. Many compare Munro's small-town settings to writers from the rural South of the United States. As in the works of William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor. her characters often confront deep-rooted customs and traditions, but the reaction of Munro's characters is generally less intense than their Southern counterparts'. Her male characters tend to capture the essence of the everyman. while her female characters are more complex. Much of Munro's work exemplifies the literary genre known as Southern Ontario Gothic. [24]

Munro's work is often compared with the great short-story writers. In her stories, as in Chekhov's, plot is secondary and "little happens." As with Chekhov, Garan Holcombe notes: "All is based on the epiphanic moment. the sudden enlightenment, the concise, subtle, revelatory detail." Munro's work deals with "love and work, and the failings of both. She shares Chekhov's obsession with time and our much-lamented inability to delay or prevent its relentless movement forward." [25]

A frequent theme of her work, particularly evident in her early stories, has been the dilemmas of a girl coming of age and coming to terms with her family and the small town she grew up in. In recent work such as Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage (2001) and Runaway (2004) she has shifted her focus to the travails of middle age, of women alone, and of the elderly. It is a mark of her style for characters to experience a revelation that sheds light on, and gives meaning to, an event.

Munro's prose reveals the ambiguities of life: "ironic and serious at the same time," "mottoes of godliness and honor and flaming bigotry," "special, useless knowledge," "tones of shrill and happy outrage," "the bad taste, the heartlessness, the joy of it." Her style places the fantastic next to the ordinary, with each undercutting the other in ways that simply and effortlessly evoke life. [26] As Robert Thacker wrote:

Munro's writing creates. an empathetic union among readers, critics most apparent among them. We are drawn to her writing by its verisimilitude – not of mimesis. so-called and. 'realism ' – but rather the feeling of being itself. of just being a human being." [27]

Many critics have asserted that Munro's stories often have the emotional and literary depth of novels. Some have asked whether Munro actually writes short stories or novels. Alex Keegan, writing in Eclectica, gave a simple answer: "Who cares? In most Munro stories there is as much as in many novels." [28]

Research on Munro's work has been undertaken since the early 1970s, with the first PhD thesis published in 1972. [29] The first book-length volume collecting the papers presented at the University of Waterloo first conference on her oeuvre was published in 1984, The Art of Alice Munro: Saying the Unsayable. [30] In 2003/2004, the journal Open Letter. Canadian quarterly review of writing and sources published 14 contributions on Munro's work, in Autumn 2010 the Journal of the Short Story in English (JSSE)/Les cahiers de la nouvelle dedicated a special issue to Munro, and in May 2012 an issue of the journal Narrative focussed on a single story by Munro, "Passion" (2004), with an introduction, a summary of the story, and five essays of analysis. [31]

Creating new versions [ edit ]

Alice Munro publishes variant versions of her stories, sometimes within a short span of time. Her works "Save the Reaper" and "Passion" came out in two different versions in the same year, in 1998 and 2004 respectively. At the other end of the scale, two stories were republished in a variant version about 30 years later, "Home" (1974/2006) and "Wood" (1980/2009). [32]

Ann Close and Lisa Dickler Awano reported in 2006 that Munro had not wanted to reread the galleys of Runaway (2004): "No, because I’ll rewrite the stories." In their symposium contribution An Appreciation of Alice Munro they say that of her story "Powers", for example, Munro did eight versions in all. [33]

Section variants of "Wood".

Awano writes that "Wood" is a good example of how Munro, being "a tireless self-editor", [34] rewrites and revises a story, in this case returning to it for a second publication nearly thirty years later. In this case, Awano says, Munro revised characterizations, themes and perspectives, as well as rhythmic syllables, a conjunction or a punctuation mark. The characters change, too. Inferring from the perspective they take on things, they are middle-age in 1980, and in 2009 they are older. Awano perceives a heightened lyricism brought about not least by the poetic precision of the revision undertaken by the author. [34] The 2009 version is made up of eight sections instead of three in 1980, and it has a new ending. Awano writes that Munro literally "refinishes" the first take on the story, with an ambiguity that is characteristic of Munro’s endings, and that the author re-imagines her stories throughout her work a variety of ways. [34]

Several stories were re-published with considerable variation as to which content goes into which section. This can be seen, for example, in "Home", "The Progress of Love", "What Do You Want to Know For?", "The Children Stay", "Save the Reaper", "The Bear Came Over the Mountain", "Passion", "The View Fom Castle Rock", "Wenlock Edge", and "Deep-Holes".

Personal life [ edit ]

Munro married James Munro in 1951. Their daughters Sheila, Catherine, and Jenny were born in 1953, 1955, and 1957 respectively; Catherine died 15 hours after birth. [ citation needed ]

In 1963, the Munros moved to Victoria where they opened Munro's Books. a popular bookstore still in business. In 1966, their daughter Andrea was born. Alice and James Munro divorced in 1972.

Munro returned to Ontario to become writer in residence at the University of Western Ontario. and in 1976 received an honorary LLD from the institution. In 1976, she married Gerald Fremlin, a cartographer and geographer she met in her university days. [13] The couple moved to a farm outside Clinton, Ontario. and later to a house in Clinton, where Fremlin died on 17 April 2013, aged 88. [35] Munro and Fremlin also owned a home in Comox, British Columbia. [1]

At a Toronto appearance in October 2009, Munro indicated that she had received treatment for cancer and for a heart condition requiring coronary-artery bypass surgery. [36]

In 2002, her daughter Sheila Munro published a childhood memoir, Lives of Mothers and Daughters: Growing Up With Alice Munro. [37]

Works [ edit ] Original short-story collections [ edit ] Short-story compilations [ edit ]
  • Selected Stories (later retitled Selected Stories 1968-1994 ) – 1996
  • No Love Lost – 2003
  • Vintage Munro – 2004
  • Alice Munro's Best: A Selection of Stories – Toronto 2006/ Carried Away: A Selection of Stories – New York 2006; both with an introduction by Margaret Atwood
  • New Selected Stories – 2011
  • Lying Under the Apple Tree. New Selected Stories. 434 pages, 15 stories, [39] c Alice Munro 2011, Vintage, London 2014, ISBN 978-0-0995-9377-5 (paperback)
  • Family Furnishings: Selected Stories 1995-2014 - 2014
Selected awards and honours [ edit ] Awards [ edit ] Honors [ edit ] Notes and references [ edit ] Further reading [ edit ]
  • Atwood, Margaret et al. "Appreciations of Alice Munro." Virginia Quarterly Review 82.3 (Summer 2006): 91–107. Interviews with various authors (Margaret Atwood. Russell Banks. Michael Cunningham. Charles McGrath, Daniel Menaker and others) presented in first-person essay format
  • Awano, Lisa Dickler. "Kindling The Creative Fire: Alice Munro's Two Versions of ‘Wood.'" New Haven Review (30 May 2012). Examining overall themes in Alice Munro's fiction through a study of her two versions of "Wood."
  • Awano, Lisa Dickler. "Alice Munro's Too Much Happiness." Virginia Quarterly Review (22 October 2010). Long-form book review of Too Much Happiness in the context of Alice Munro's canon.
  • Besner, Neil Kalman. Introducing Alice Munro's Lives of Girls and Women: a reader's guide. (Toronto: ECW Press, 1990)
  • Blodgett, E. D. Alice Munro. (Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1988)
  • Buchholtz, Miroslawa (ed.). Alice Munro. Understanding, Adapting, Teaching (Springer International Publishing, 2016)
  • Carrington, Ildikó de Papp. Controlling the Uncontrollable: the fiction of Alice Munro. (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1989)
  • Carscallen, James. The Other Country: patterns in the writing of Alice Munro. (Toronto: ECW Press, 1993)
  • Cox, Alisa. Alice Munro. (Tavistock: Northcote House, 2004)
  • Dahlie, Hallvard. Alice Munro and Her Works. (Toronto: ECW Press, 1984)
  • Davey, Frank. 'Class, Family Furnishings, and Munro's Early Stories.' In Ventura and Conde. 79–88.
  • de Papp Carrington, Ildiko."What's in a Title. Alice Munro's 'Carried Away.'" Studies in Short Fiction. 20.4 (Fall 1993): 555.
  • Dolnick, Ben. "A Beginner's Guide to Alice Munro" The Millions (5 July 2012)
  • Elliott, Gayle. "A Different Track: Feminist meta-narrative in Alice Munro's 'Friend of My Youth.'" Journal of Modern Literature. 20.1 (Summer 1996): 75.
  • Fowler, Rowena. "The Art of Alice Munro: The Beggar Maid and Lives of Girls and Women." Critique. 25.4 (Summer 1984): 189.
  • Garson, Marjorie. "Alice Munro and Charlotte Bronte." University of Toronto Quarterly 69.4 (Fall 2000): 783.
  • Genoways, Ted. "Ordinary Outsiders." Virginia Quarterly Review 82.3 (Summer 2006): 80–81.
  • Gibson, Douglas. Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre Trudeau, and Others. (ECW Press, 2011.) Excerpt.
  • Gittings, Christopher E. "Constructing a Scots-Canadian Ground: Family history and cultural translation in Alice Munro." Studies in Short Fiction 34.1 (Winter 1997): 27
  • Hebel, Ajay. The Tumble of Reason: Alice Munro's discourse of absence. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1994)
  • Hiscock, Andrew. "Longing for a Human Climate: Alice Munro's 'Friend of My Youth' and the culture of loss." Journal of Commonwealth Literature 32.2 (1997): 18.
  • Hooper, Brad The Fiction of Alice Munro: An Appreciation (Westport, Conn. Praeger, 2008), ISBN 978-0-275-99121-0
  • Houston, Pam. "A Hopeful Sign: The making of metonymic meaning in Munro's 'Meneseteung.'" Kenyon Review 14.4 (Fall 1992): 79.
  • Howells, Coral Ann. Alice Munro. (New York: Manchester University Press, 1998), ISBN 978-0-7190-4558-5
  • Hoy, H. "'Dull, Simple, Amazing and Unfathomable': Paradox and Double Vision In Alice Munro's Fiction." Studies in Canadian Literature/Études en littérature canadienne (SCL/ÉLC), Volume 5.1. (1980).
  • Lecercle, Jean-Jacques. 'Alice Munro's Two Secrets.' In Ventura and Conde. 25–37.
  • Levene, Mark. "It Was About Vanishing: A Glimpse of Alice Munro's Stories." University of Toronto Quarterly 68.4 (Fall 1999): 841.
  • Lynch, Gerald. "No Honey, I'm Home." Canadian Literature 160 (Spring 1999): 73.
  • MacKendrick, Louis King. Some Other Reality: Alice Munro's Something I've Been Meaning to Tell You. (Toronto: ECW Press, 1993)
  • Martin, W.R. Alice Munro: paradox and parallel. (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 1987)
  • Mazur, Carol and Moulder, Cathy. Alice Munro: An Annotated Bibliography of Works and Criticism. (Toronto: Scarecrow Press, 2007) ISBN 978-0810859241
  • McCaig, JoAnn. Reading In: Alice Munro's archives. (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2002)
  • Miller, Judith, ed. The Art of Alice Munro: saying the unsayable: papers from the Waterloo conference. (Waterloo: Waterloo Press, 1984)
  • Munro, Sheila. Lives of Mother and Daughters: growing up with Alice Munro. (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 2001)
  • Pfaus, B. Alice Munro. (Ottawa: Golden Dog Press, 1984.)
  • Rasporich, Beverly Jean. Dance of the Sexes: art and gender in the fiction of Alice Munro. (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 1990)
  • Redekop, Magdalene. Mothers and Other Clowns: the stories of Alice Munro. (New York: Routledge, 1992)
  • Ross, Catherine Sheldrick. Alice Munro: a double life. (Toronto: ECW Press, 1992.)
  • Simpson, Mona. A Quiet Genius The Atlantic. (December 2001)
  • Smythe, Karen E. Figuring Grief: Gallant, Munro and the poetics of elegy. (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1992)
  • Somacarrera, Pilar. A Spanish Passion for the Canadian Short Story: Reader Responses to Alice Munro’s Fiction in Web 2.0Open Access . in: Made in Canada, Read in Spain: Essays on the Translation and Circulation of English-Canadian LiteratureOpen Access . edited by Pilar Somacarrera, de Gruyter, Berlin 2013, p. 129–144, ISBN 9788376560175
  • Steele, Apollonia and Tener, Jean F. editors. The Alice Munro Papers: Second Accession. (Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 1987)
  • Tausky, Thomas E. Biocritical Essay. The University of Calgary Library Special Collections (1986)
  • Thacker, Robert. Alice Munro: writing her lives: a biography. (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 2005)
  • Thacker, Robert. Ed. The Rest of the Story: critical essays on Alice Munro. (Toronto: ECW Press, 1999)
  • Ventura, Héliane, and Mary Condé, eds. Alice Munro.Open Letter 11:9 (Fall-Winter 2003-4). ISSN 0048-1939. Proceedings of the Alice Munro conference L'écriture du secret/Writing Secrets, Université d'Orléans, 2003.
External links [ edit ]

Source:

wpedia.goo.ne.jp

Frankfurt Book Fair - Translation funding

Translation Funding Programmes for the promotion of translations
  • Belgium

Ministère de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles Boulevard Léopold II, 44,
B- 1080 Bruxelles
Phone. +32 2 413 20 86
Fax. +32 2 413 28 94
E-mail. secretariat.promolettres@cfwb.be
Website. www.promotiondeslettres.cfwb.de

In order to promote the publication, in translation, of Belgian works of literature written in french abroad, subsidies are available from the Ministère de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles. Publishing houses, with the exception of those located in Wallonia or Brussels and publishing in French, may put in an application to the Service de la Promotion des Lettres du Ministère de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, for the translation of novels, literary essays, poetry collections and play scripts. The Service de la Promotion des Lettres does not assist in the publication; its subsidies are there to reduce the foreign publishing house’s translations costs by paying for the whole or for a part of the translator’s fee.

  • Canada (Québec )

SODEC - Société de développement des entreprises culturelles 215 Saint-Jacques Street, 8th Floor
Montréal (Québec) H2Y 1M6 Canada
Tel. + 1-800-363-0401 or + 1-514-841-2299
Louis Dubé, Project Manager
Tel. + 1-514-841-2202
E-Mail: louis.dube@sodec.gouv.qc.ca
Website: www.sodec.gouv.qc.ca/fr

SODEC provides financial assistance for the translation of literary works written by Québec authors, published by Québec publishers, and subject to the sale or licensing of rights to a foreign publisher. This program aims at providing visibility for Québec authors and literature. This program provides funds to translate works of Québec authors into any language. Works submitted are either new or backlist titles in the following categories: fiction, short stories, drama, children’s literature and illustrated albums, essays in human sciences, arts, comic strips, songs anthology. Translators can be hired by the foreign publisher; rates are left to the discretion of the parties involved.

  • France

Founded in 1946, the National Book Centre is a public agency in France's Ministry of Culture and Communication, operating within the General Media and Cultural Activities Department. The CNL’s mission is to support all actors in the book publishing chain including authors, broadcasters, publishers, bookshops, libraries, and literary events organisers. To do so it offers a wide range of aid totalling some €42 million a year in the form of subsidies, credits, grants, and zero-rate loans, which are allocated after consulting specialist committees. CNL operates both in France and abroad. Focused on fairness and reciprocity, it strives to promote French literature on the international stage and foreign literature in France in return. It thus offers a forum for welcoming, informing, mediating, and exchanging visions globally, accessible to all.
Support programmes for translators: To foster the translation and the dissemination of foreign works in France, and of French works, in all their diversity, in other countries. Subsidies for translating foreign-language works into French: This award is intended to fund the cost of translating foreign works into French. Subsidies for translating French works into foreign languages: This award is intended to fund the cost of translating French works into foreign languages.

  • Argentina

Programa sur de Subsidio a las Traducciones Dirección general de asuntos culturales
Cancillería Argentina
+54 (11) 4819 7295
+54 (11) 4310 8361
Fax: +54 (11) 4819 7309
http://programa-sur.mrecic.gov.ar/en/
Contact: Diego Lorenzo
E-Mail: lzd@mrecic.gov.ar

In order to disseminate and promote Argentine literature and culture, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, International Trade and Worship of the Argentine Republic (Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Comercio Internacional y Culto) offers a financial support program for the translation of works by Argentine authors for subsequent publication by foreign publishing houses.

  • Brazil

Brazil - Literature Translation Grant Fundação Biblioteca Nacional
Coordenadoria Geral do Livro e da Leitura
Rua da Imprensa 16 / 11º andar - Centro
20030-120 – Rio de Janeiro – RJ – Brazil
Tel. +55 21 2220-2057/ 2220-1987
Fax: +55 21 2220-2057
E-Mail: cgll@bn.br
Website: www.bn.br/translationgrant

Brazil – Literature Translation Grant aims to disseminate Brazilian culture abroad. It was created by the Brazilian Ministry of Culture (MinC), through Fundação Biblioteca Nacional – FBN (National Library Foundation) and its Coordenadoria Geral do Livro e da Leitura – CGLL (General Department of Books and Reading). It is intended for foreign publishers who wish to translate and publish books written by Brazilian authors.

  • Portugal

Instituto Português do Livro e das Bibliotecas Campo Grande 83
P - 1751 Lisboa Codex
Tel. +35 121 798 2080
Fax: +35 121 798 2141
E-Mail: acastro@iplb.pt
Website: www.iplb.pt

Promotes Portuguese literature abroad and provides subsidies for foreign publishers of translations of works by Portuguese authors and those from African countries whose official language is Portuguese. The subsidies cover 50- 100% of the translation costs.

Subsidies for the publication of works by Portuguese authors or about Portuguese culture in a foreign language, intended to cover production and publication costs and not the translator´s fee as such (see under Instituto Português do Livro e das Bibliotecas for translation subsidies). The size of the subsidy depends on the production costs and publisher´s total budget.

  • Spain - Catalonia

Institut Ramon Llull Diputacio 279, baixos
E - 08007 Barcelona
Tel. +34 934 678000
Fax: +34 934 678006
E-Mail: irl@llull.com
Website: www.llull.com

One of the aims of the Institute is the diffusion of literature written in Catalan through the support and promotion of translations from Catalan into other languages, their commercial publication and adequate advertising support.

  • Spain

Ministerio de Educación y Cultura y Deporte Dirección General del Libro, Archivos y Bibliotecas, Plaza del Rey 1
E - 28004 Madrid
Tel. +34 91 536 88 84 / 536 88 76
Fax: +34 91 536 88 22
E-Mail: informa.admini@sgt.mcu.es
Website: www.mec.es

The Ministry promotes Spanish books and literature abroad, participates in international books fairs and provides subsidies to publishers and magazines to finance the cost of translation of literary works originally written and published in any of the official languages of Spain.

  • Australia

Australia Council for the Arts PO Box 788
Strawberry Hills NSW 2012
Tel. +61 2 9215 9050
Fax: +61 2 9215 9111
E-Mail: literature@ozco.gov.au
Website:www.ozco.gov.au

Through its Literature section, under the Presentation and Promotion programme, the Australia Council provides grants to overseas magazine and book publishers for the following: writers' and translators' fees and/or publication costs of overseas editions of the work of living Australian writers in eligible genres, works of cultural significance which are substantially by or about living Australian writers or issues of magazines devoted to Australian creative writing. The Board encourages applications from overseas publishers who are establishing an Australian list. More than one title may be included within the same application.

  • Canada

The Canada Council for the Arts 350 Albert Street, P.O. Box 1047
Ottawa, Ontario, K1P 5V8
Tel. +1 800 263 5588 (Canada only) or (613) 566 4414
Fax: +613 566-4410
E-Mail: catherine.montgomery@canadacouncil.ca
Website: www.canadacouncil.ca/writing

The Canada Council for the Arts provides assistance to foreign publishers for the translation of literary works by Canadian authors into languages other than French or English, for publication abroad. Priority will be given to books that have been nominated for or have won literary awards administered by the Canada Council. Assistance is also provided for the first translation of works written by Canadians into French, English or an Aboriginal language with a view to the publication of the works in Canada.

  • Canada (Québec )

SODEC - Société de développement des entreprises culturelles 215 Saint-Jacques Street, 8th Floor
Montréal (Québec) H2Y 1M6 Canada
Tel. + 1-800-363-0401 or + 1-514-841-2299
Louis Dubé, Project Manager
Tel. + 1-514-841-2202
E-Mail: louis.dube@sodec.gouv.qc.ca
Website: http://www.sodec.gouv.qc.ca/fr/home/english

SODEC provides financial assistance for the translation of literary works written by Québec authors, published by Québec publishers, and subject to the sale or licensing of rights to a foreign publisher. This program aims at providing visibility for Québec authors and literature. This program provides funds to translate works of Québec authors into any language. Works submitted are either new or backlist titles in the following categories: fiction, short stories, drama, children’s literature and illustrated albums, essays in human sciences, arts, comic strips, songs anthology. Translators can be hired by the foreign publisher; rates are left to the discretion of the parties involved.

  • Ireland

ELIC Estonian Literature Information Centre Voorimehe 9
10146 Tallinn
Tel. +372 631 48 70
Fax: +372 631 48 71
E-Mail: estlit@estlit.ee
Website: www.estlit.ee

The aim of the Estonian Literature Information Centre is to promote awareness of Estonian writing abroad, with particular emphasis on fiction, poetry, drama and children books and to provide the international literary world with up-to-date information on Estonian literature and the literary scene in Estonia.

Traducta Programme
Suur-Karja 23
10148 Tallinn
Tel. +372 644 69 22 or +372 631 40 82
Fax: +372 631 40 85
E-Mail: kulka@kulka.ee
Website: www.kulka.ee

Traducta is a literary translation grant funded by the Cultural Endowment of Estonia (Eesti Kultuurkapital). The Traducta grant has been established in order to encourage the translation of Estonian authors into foreign languages and facilitate the publication of Estonian literature abroad.

  • Finland

FILI - Finnish Literature Information Centre Mariankatu 7 A 2
FIN - 00170 Helsinki
Tel. +358 201 131 293
Fax: +358 9 656 380
E-Mail: fili@finlit.fi
Website: www.finlit.fi/fili

FILI - Finnish Literature Information Centre promotes the awareness of Finnish literature and non-fiction abroad in addition to providing financial support for the translation of Finnish, Finnish-Swedish and Saami literature into other languages. As of the beginning of 2003, translation grants will also be awarded for the translation into Finnish of high quality fiction and non-fiction in small circulation as well as for the translation into Swedish of non-fiction and academic publications.

  • Greece

National Book Centre of Greece (EKEBI) Promotion of Greek books abroad
Attention: Maria Rousaki
4 Athanasiou Diakou Street
11742 Athens
Tel. + 30 210 9200348
Fax: + 30 210 9200305
E-Mail: mrousaki@ekebi.gr
Website: www.ekebi.gr

Frasis is a programme set up by the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Tourism and the National Book Centre of Greece. It sponsors the publication abroad, in high quality translations, of notable works that reflect the diversity of Greek publishing. Frasis concerns books either in the public domain or under copyright which, when translated, will help make the Greek cultural heritage better known.
Visit: www.frasis.gr or www.frasis.eu

  • Hungary

Provides information about Hungarian books and authors, publishes annual selection of titles and provides grants for the translation of quality Hungarian fiction and poetry titles into other languages.

Source:

www.buchmesse.de

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