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The War Of The Worlds - Isbn:9781467776219

Category: Fiction

  • Book Title: The War of the Worlds
  • ISBN 13: 9781467776219
  • ISBN 10: 1467776211
  • Author: H. G. Wells
  • Category: Fiction
  • Category (general): Fiction
  • Publisher: First Avenue Editions
  • Format & Number of pages: 206 pages, book
  • Synopsis: Fancy having one of them lovely things, with its Heat-Ray wide and free! Fancy having it in control! What would it matter if you smashed to smithereens at the end of the run, after a bust like that? Ireckon theMartians'll open their beautiful eyes!

Another description

The War of the Worlds

Book One: The Coming of the Martians Book Two: The Earth Under the Martians About this Edition

This Web edition of The War of the Worlds was prepared in June of 1995 by John Walker. It is based on the Project Gutenberg electronic text (etext) edition, warw11.txt which I obtained from the mirror archive then maintained by L'Association des bibliophiles Universels where you will also find a wide variety of French language public domain texts.

Legal notice: This document is in the public domain and may be distributed and used without any restrictions or royalties whatsoever. It is not being distributed under the Project Gutenberg trademark, and Project Gutenberg bears no responsibility or liability resulting from use of this document. (This statement is included pursuant to the "small print" at the start of the original document.)

The original ASCII etext was produced by Michael Oltz at Cornell University. Having created an etext and Web edition of Jules Verne's De la Terre � la Lune myself, I'm well aware that 99.9% of the effort goes into producing the original ASCII document; from there to the Web isn't much work at all. It's only because Mr. Oltz contributed the many hours it takes to scan and proofread the original text that you can enjoy it here. Thank you!

Also by H. G. Wells

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The War Of The Worlds by H

At the end of the nineteenth century, a metal object fell from the sky in the South of England and made a large hole in the ground. People came to learn, what had happened. They surrounded the hole, looking at the strange object. When one end of the object started opening, the watchers realized it was hollow. Was there anybody inside? But the creatures, which came out, were not homo sapiens… Gradually people began to realize that these creatures were from Mars. A small group of scientists and many other people who had come to see, were killed instantly. Later the second object landed and then the third one. Are the Martians trying to take our planet away? Is it true? And what are our chances for victory in the war against the civilization, whose development is for thousand years ahead. Moreover, the Martians become stronger in the atmosphere.

Total words: 25971
Unique words: 1960

Words, you might not know:

deafened, jeweller, fattened, capturing, tearless, clearness, whitened, lipless, bush, tinned, noiseless, wetly, lord, believing, newsboy, emptied, friendless, designed, helpfulness, sightseer, broadened, discolored, noiselessly, unwell, tensely, milkman, telegraph.

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The Thames Murderer

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The War of the Worlds by H

Description

Extraterrestrial invasion, the earth taken over by omniscient intelligences from Mars, the whole of humanity under siege and a nameless narrator who seems to be the lone survivor of the complete devastation of human civilization – scenes from a Hollywood sci-fi blockbuster? Far from it! The War of the Worlds by HG Wells was written more than a century ago and went on to become an iconic work in the science fiction genre, spawning a whole new genre of literature featuring alien invaders. It was in fact the first book to present the idea of conflict between inhabitants of different planets.

The story begins in an observatory in Ottershaw, when scientists note a series of mysterious explosions taking place on Mars. Some days later, the narrator who is on a walk on the Surrey Downs notices a weird cylindrical vehicle that suddenly opens to release a horde of hideous creatures who are later discovered to be Martians. The creatures are unable to breathe Earth's air and swiftly return to their vehicle. A peace delegation of humans tries to make contact but they're ruthlessly scorched to death by Martian heat-ray weapons. Thus begins the War of the Worlds. The British military swings into action, but their arms and ammunition are defenseless against sophisticated chemical weapons and heat-rays.

Events race towards calamity as the nations of the earth unite to combat these fearful invaders to no avail. Survivors are reduced to scavenging for food with the cities of the world reduced to mere rubble. Can the human race survive? Will the narrator and his family escape destruction?

The author, HG Wells was a science teacher in a small village in Somerset, England. However, he was also a gifted writer who wrote in several genres – science fiction, literary novels, short stories, history, politics and social sciences. A keen student of war and combat, he created a set of rules for playing war games with toy soldiers, which provides an interesting glimpse of logistics, strategy and close combat techniques. Wells' contribution to our ideas of science fiction remains unparalleled and the book has been widely filmed, staged and televised. The War of the Worlds was immortalized as a Halloween prank in a radio show that aired on CBS on October 30, 1938, causing widespread panic and chaos as listeners across the United States tuned in and began fleeing from their homes!

The enduring appeal of this book makes it a must read classic for readers of all ages.

Download & play audiobook

Reviewer: Mark - March 17, 2016

Subject: Good story, excellently narrated

This is a classic SF work that will appeal to many, as it is well-paced and full of both action and poignantly thoughtful moments. It's very well-suited to be an audiobook because it has a true journalist/storyteller feel to it by the author's design. My wife and I listened to a chapter each night before bed and thoroughly enjoyed it. The narrator is nearly flawless and quite dedicated to producing an excellent version of the story that will keep you riveted from beginning to end. If you're an American like me, just ignore the extensive geographical name dropping of English geography (the book's biggest hurdle when it comes to relatability) and enjoy the ride!

Reviewer: BLG - December 29, 2015

Brilliant narration! Story had me hooked from the first chapter. was sad that it ended

Reviewer: Julie - October 14, 2015

Subject: Review war of the worlds

Wow! What a fantastic and riveting book. I had no idea how the original actually went. This must have been a terrifying book in its day. EXCELLENT NARRATION! This guy should read more of the classics. I don't know his name but hats off to him!

Reviewer: e g t - August 18, 2015

Subject: THE WAR OF THE WORLDS

excellent story excellently narrated

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The War of the Worlds Book 1, Chapter 1 Summary

The War of the Worlds The War of the Worlds Book 1, Chapter 1 Summary The Eve of the War
  • The story starts with some very general statements about life before the war, such as the famous opening line: "No one would have believed in the last years of the 19th century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinized and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinize the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water" (1.1.1). Creepy alert!
  • At first, we don't know who is talking. Is this an omniscient narrator or a character in the story?
  • But we do know a war is coming because the chapter title tells us. Also, "war" is in the book's title – so, really, there are lots of clues that war is coming. We know that, but the people on Earth don't know it. Yet. (Cue threatening music.)
  • The narrator gives us some background information on Mars – info that he pretends we already know (1.1.2). Like, you know that Mars is running out of natural resources, right? Everybody knows that. The real question is whether the Martians have considered invading Earth for its natural resources.
  • Now, we might not want the Martians to invade and kill us and steal all our stuff, but the narrator reminds us that that's exactly what humans have done to each other – like when the British pretty much wiped out the Tasmanians. So who are we to complain?
  • The narrator notes that people saw some flashes of light on Mars, but didn't know what they meant.
  • If you're keeping track, so far the narrator has described people as dangerous (at least if you're a Tasmanian – which you're not, because they're extinct) and as a little shortsighted. You can already tell that this isn't going to be a feel-good story that makes you proud to be human.
  • By the way, this all happened six years ago (1.1.9), so the narrator knows how everything turns out all right. Now we know that at least one person survived. (Unless this is a Martian narrator – shoot.)
  • Also, though we know this happened six years ago, the narrator never tells us what year it all started. He mentions 1894 as the year some great light was seen on Mars, but that light is not the flashes he mentioned.
  • Finally, the narrator reveals himself as someone in the story, though someone without a name.
  • Now, on to the real action.
  • The narrator meets the astronomer Ogilvy, who invites him to the observatory to see the weird lights on Mars.
  • The night at the observatory is entirely ordinary by our human standards. The narrator drinks some water because he's thirsty and the people in the villages are fast asleep.
  • The narrator then contrasts this ordinary stuff with the coming of the Martians. He notes that things are hunky-dory now, but there's some "Thing" coming to Earth to bring "struggle and calamity and death" (1.1.13).
  • Ogilvy doesn't believe that Mars has intelligent life. He thinks the strange lights are just volcanoes or meteorites falling on Mars.
  • Astronomers observe flashes of light on Mars once a day for ten days. The newspapers mention these strange lights, but no one can guess what they really mean. Instead, people just go about their ordinary lives. For instance, the narrator spends his time learning how to ride a bicycle. (Check out "Setting " for more on the bicycle. Seriously.)
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The War of the Worlds by H

The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells

The War of the Worlds

by H. G. Wells [1898]


But who shall dwell in these worlds if they be
inhabited. Are we or they Lords of the
World. And how are all things made for man? —
KEPLER (quoted in The Anatomy of Melancholy)

THE COMING OF THE MARTIANS

THE EVE OF THE WAR

No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth
century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by
intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as
men busied themselves about their various concerns they were
scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a
microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and
multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to
and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their
assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the
infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to
the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of
them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or
improbable. It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of
those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be
other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to
welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds
that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish,
intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with
envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And
early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment.

The planet Mars, I scarcely need remind the reader, revolves about the
sun at a mean distance of 140,000,000 miles, and the light and heat it
receives from the sun is barely half of that received by this world.
It must be, if the nebular hypothesis has any truth, older than our
world; and long before this earth ceased to be molten, life upon its
surface must have begun its course. The fact that it is scarcely one
seventh of the volume of the earth must have accelerated its cooling
to the temperature at which life could begin. It has air and water
and all that is necessary for the support of animated existence.

Yet so vain is man, and so blinded by his vanity, that no writer,
up to the very end of the nineteenth century, expressed any idea that
intelligent life might have developed there far, or indeed at all,
beyond its earthly level. Nor was it generally understood that since
Mars is older than our earth, with scarcely a quarter of the
superficial area and remoter from the sun, it necessarily follows that
it is not only more distant from time's beginning but nearer its end.

The secular cooling that must someday overtake our planet has
already gone far indeed with our neighbour. Its physical condition is
still largely a mystery, but we know now that even in its equatorial
region the midday temperature barely approaches that of our coldest
winter. Its air is much more attenuated than ours, its oceans have
shrunk until they cover but a third of its surface, and as its slow
seasons change huge snowcaps gather and melt about either pole and
periodically inundate its temperate zones. That last stage of
exhaustion, which to us is still incredibly remote, has become a
present-day problem for the inhabitants of Mars. The immediate

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Harrison M

Harrison M. The Economics of World War II: Six Great Powers in International Comparison

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. — ISBN-10: 0521785030, ISBN-13: 9780521785037.
This book provides a new quantitative view of the wartime economic experiences of six great powers: the UK, the USA, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the USSR. What contribution did economics make to war preparedness and to winning or losing the war? What was the effect of wartime experiences on postwar fortunes, and did those who won the war lose the peace? A chapter is devoted to each country, reviewing its economic war potential, military-economic policies and performance, war expenditures, and development, while the introductory chapter presents a comparative overview. The result of an international collaborative project, the volume aims to provide a text of statistical reference for students and researchers interested in international and comparative economic history, the history of World War II, the history of economic policy, and comparative economic systems. It embodies the latest in economic analysis and historical research.

Harrison has put together an extremely useful book on comparative economic history. The six essays are all very well done, and all conclude with sections outlining the impact of the war on post-war growth. This book adds to our understanding of war economics and the shape of the world economy in the second half of the twentieth century." Geofrey Mills, EH.NET.
This book, the result of an international collaborative project, provides a new quantitative view of the wartime economic experiences of six great powers: the UK, the USA, Germany, Italy, Japan and the USSR. A chapter is devoted to each country, while the introductory chapter presents a comparative overview. It aims to provide a text of statistical reference for those interested in international and comparative economic history, the history of World War II, the history of economic policy, and comparative economic systems.

Contents .
List of figures page.
List of tables.
List of contributors.
Preface.
List of abbreviations.
The economics of World War II: an overview.
The United Kingdom: 'Victory at all costs'.
The United States: from ploughshares to swords.
Germany: guns, butter, and economic miracles.
Italy: how to lose the war and win the peace.
Japan: guns before rice.
The Soviet Union: the defeated victor.
Index.

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