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Obsessive Compulsive And Related Disorders, An Issue Of Psychiatric Clinics Of North America, - Isbn:9780323323420

Category: Medical

  • Book Title: Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, An Issue of Psychiatric Clinics of North America,
  • ISBN 13: 9780323323420
  • ISBN 10: 0323323421
  • Author: Wayne K. Goodman
  • Category: Medical
  • Category (general): Medical
  • Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
  • Format & Number of pages: 217 pages, book
  • Synopsis: A comparison of insight in body dysmorphic disorder and obsessive–compulsive disorder. J Psychiatr Res 2012 ... Wilhelm S, Phillips KA, Steketee G. Cognitive- behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a treatment manual. New York:  ...

Another description

Treatment of Sexual Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms During Exposure and Response Prevention

Treatment of Sexual Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms During Exposure and Response Prevention

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Abstract

This chapter discusses the treatment of a Kyle, a young adult with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and focuses on the design and implementation of cognitive behavioral therapy with exposure and response prevention to treat Kyle’s sexual obsessions and compulsions. This case report begins by reviewing background literature on sexual obsessive-compulsive symptoms, as well as factors that are relevant to conducting exposures to treat these symptoms. A discussion of relevant background information about Kyle, our case conceptualization, and a session-by-session account of exposures that were conducted to target Kyle’s obsessive-compulsive symptoms (with an emphasis on the treatment of Kyle’s sexual symptoms) is presented. Several barriers that had to be addressed during these exposure sessions are reviewed, such as therapists’ non-avoidance of sexually explicit content due to their own anxiety or disgust sensitivity, and the chapter concludes with clinical recommendations for therapists who conduct exposures to treat sexual obsessive-compulsive symptoms in adults.

Keywords

OCD Sexual symptoms CBT EXRP Therapist non-avoidance Adults

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Articles

Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, An Issue of Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 1e (The Clinics: Internal Medicine) by Wayne K

Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, An Issue of Psychiatric…

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0323323413. Hardcover)

Neurotransmitters in the brain are the current focus of obsessive compulsive disorders to better address the approximately 2.5 million people in the United States diagnosed with OCD. As seems the way of psychiatry practice, a disorder is viewed and treated from one perspective for a period, then a new perspective is in the forefront. Such is the case with obsessive compulsive disorders, originally treated as a behavioral problem with psychotherapy, now considered a brain circuitry disorder that can be treated with psychopharmacotherapeutics. This issue contains topics that focus on neuroscience of the brain and genetics in relation to OCD, providing the psychiatrist a comprehensive review of the current thought, approach, diagnosis, and treatment related to OCD and its related disorders. Topics include: Etiological hypotheses of OCD - molecules to circuits; Models of obsessive compulsive and related disorders; Cognitive neuroscience of OCD; Genetics of obsessive compulsive and related disorders; Tic disorders - spearate or related disorder; Pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS); Body dysmorphic disorder; Trichotillomania; Hoarding disorder; Pharmacotherapy; Device based interventions; Cognitive behavioral therapy for OCD.

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 30 Aug 2015 02:08:10 -0400)

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Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, An Issue of Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Volume 37-3 - 1st Edition ISBN: 9780323323413

Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, An Issue of Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Volume 37-3 Description

Neurotransmitters in the brain are the current focus of obsessive compulsive disorders to better address the approximately 2.5 million people in the United States diagnosed with OCD. As seems the way of psychiatry practice, a disorder is viewed and treated from one perspective for a period, then a new perspective is in the forefront. Such is the case with obsessive compulsive disorders, originally treated as a behavioral problem with psychotherapy, now considered a brain circuitry disorder that can be treated with psychopharmacotherapeutics. This issue contains topics that focus on neuroscience of the brain and genetics in relation to OCD, providing the psychiatrist a comprehensive review of the current thought, approach, diagnosis, and treatment related to OCD and its related disorders. Topics include: Etiological hypotheses of OCD - molecules to circuits; Models of obsessive compulsive and related disorders; Cognitive neuroscience of OCD; Genetics of obsessive compulsive and related disorders; Tic disorders - spearate or related disorder; Pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS); Body dysmorphic disorder; Trichotillomania; Hoarding disorder; Pharmacotherapy; Device based interventions; Cognitive behavioral therapy for OCD.

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Language: English Copyright: © Elsevier 2014

Published: 4th September 2014 Imprint: Elsevier eBook ISBN: 9780323323420 Hardcover ISBN: 9780323323413

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ISBN: 0195335287 - Exposure And Response (Ritual) Prevention For Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Therapist Guide (Treatments That Work) - OPENISBN Proj

Exposure And Response (Ritual) Prevention For Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Therapist Guide (Treatments That Work)

An estimated 2-3% of the population is affected by obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This is a chronic condition that significantly affects daily functioning and quality of life. Many people with OCD would greatly benefit from receiving professional help to learn how to successfully manage this debilitating condition. This book guides clinicians in treating individuals with OCD through the use of exposure and ritual (response) prevention, one of the most effective and the most studied treatments for OCD.

Designed to be used in conjunction with its companion patient workbook titled Treating Your OCD with Exposure and Ritual (Response) Prevention Therapy. this Therapist Guide includes supporting theoretical, historical and research background information, diagnostic descriptions, differential diagnoses, session by session treatment outlines, case examples, sample dialogues, practice assignments, and tailored application to the vast variety of presentations and nuances of the disorder. The manual contains the 'nuts and bolts' of how to provide the treatment and is a comprehensive resource for therapists. It is an invaluable guide for clinicians in overcoming the barriers and difficulties that are part and parcel of every treatment.

"Exposure and ritual (response) prevention (EX/RP) is the best treatment we have for obsessive compulsive disorder. The Therapist Guide and Workbook by Foa, Yadin, and Licher will do two very important things. The first is to make EX/RP much more available to people suffering from OCD. The second is to help ensure that the treatment that is made more available is a treatment that should really work."--Michael R. Liebowitz M.D. Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Columbia University and Former Director, Anxiety Disorders Clinic, New York State Psychiatric Institute

"In this well-organized and succinct manual, leading experts describe exposure and ritual (response) prevention (EX/RP), a proven first-line treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). They detail how to evaluate clients for EX/RP treatment, provide session-by-session instructions for treatment delivery, and offer invaluable advice on handling problems like patient nonadherence. This outstanding therapist manual, together with its accompanying client workbook, provides state-of-the-art tools for transforming the lives of people with OCD."--H. Blair Simpson, M.D. Ph.D. Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Columbia University Director of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic and the OCD Research Program at the New York State Psychiatric Institute

"A concise, up-to-date, and extremely useful clinical guide to understanding and treating people struggling with OCD. State-of-the-art essentials for how to provide the most effective intervention for this often difficult to treat condition are covered in a clear and practical manner that is certain to facilitate positive outcomes."--Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D. ABPP, Professor of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

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Psychiatric Clinics of North America 2000-2013 Full Issues

Psychiatric Clinics of North America 2000-2013 Full Issues Mis Libros de Medicina Present: Issue list
  • Volume 36, Issue 2 Psychiatric Manifestations of Neurotoxins Edited by Daniel E. Rusyniak and Michael R. Dobbs
  • Volume 36, Issue 1 Complementary and Integrative Therapies for Psychiatric Disorders Edited by Philip R. Muskin, Patricia L. Gerbarg and Richard P. Brown
  • Volume 35, Issue 4 Forensic Psychiatry Edited by Charles L. Scott
  • Volume 35, Issue 3 Schizophrenia Edited by Peter F. Buckley
  • Volume 35, Issue 2 Addiction Edited by Itai Danovitch and John J. Mariani
  • Volume 35, Issue 1 Depression Edited by David L. Mintz
  • Volume 34, Issue 4 Obesity and Associated Eating Disorders: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals Edited by Thomas A. Wadden, G. Terence Wilson, Albert J. Stunkard and Robert I. Berkowitz
  • Volume 34, Issue 3 Psychosomatic Medicine Edited by Joel E. Dimsdale
  • Volume 34, Issue 2 Geriatric Psychiatry: Advances and Directions Edited by George S. Alexopoulos and Dimitris N. Kiosses
  • Volume 34, Issue 1 Prevention in Mental Health: Lifespan Perspective Edited by Dilip V. Jeste and Carl C. Bell
  • Volume 33, Issue 4 Traumatic Brain Injury: Defining Best Practice Edited by Silvana Riggio and Andy Jagoda
  • Volume 33, Issue 3 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Edited by Bunmi O. Olatunji
  • Volume 33, Issue 2 Women’s Mental Health Edited by Susan G. Kornstein and Anita H. Clayton
  • Volume 33, Issue 1 Psychiatric Genetics Edited by James B. Potash
  • Volume 32, Issue 4 Psychiatric and Physical Comorbidity in Schizophrenia Edited by Michael Y. Hwang and Henry A. Nasrallah
  • Volume 32, Issue 3 Anxiety Disorders Edited by H-U. Wittchen and A.T. Gloster
  • Volume 32, Issue 2 Ethics in Psychiatry: A Review Edited by L.W. Roberts and J.G. Hoop
  • Volume 32, Issue 1 Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for the General Psychiatrist Edited by M. McCarthy and R.L. Hendren
  • Volume 31, Issue 4 Sexually Compulsive Behavior: Hypersexuality Edited by M.F. Schwartz and F. Berlin
  • Volume 31, Issue 3 Recent Research in Personality Disorders Edited by J. Paris
  • Volume 31, Issue 2 Suicidal Behavior: A Developmental Perspective Edited by M.A. Oquendo and J.J. Mann
  • Volume 31, Issue 1 Administrative Psychiatry: Advancing Quality Care Edited by D.R. Wilson and P.F. Buckley
  • Volume 30, Issue 4 Psychosomatic Medicine Edited by J.L. Levenson, D.F. Gitlin and C. Crone
  • Volume 30, Issue 3 Schizophrenia: A Complex Disease Necessitating Complex Care Edited by P.F. Buckley
  • Volume 30, Issue 2 Clinical Interviewing: Practical Tips from Master Clinicians Edited by S.C. Shea
  • Volume 30, Issue 1 New Developments in Depression Research Edited by D.V. Iosifescu and A.A. Nierenberg
  • Volume 29, Issue 4 The Sleep-Psychiatry Interface Edited by K. Doghramji
  • Volume 29, Issue 3 Forensic Psychiatry Edited by C.L. Scott
  • Volume 29, Issue 2 Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders Edited by D.J. Stein
  • Volume 29, Issue 1 Dissociative Disorders: An Expanding Window into the Psychobiology of the Mind Edited by R.A. Chefetz
  • Volume 28, Issue 4 Evidence-Based Geriatric Psychiatry Edited by S.J. Bartels
  • Volume 28, Issue 3 Neuropsychiatry Edited by Silvana Riggio
  • Volume 28, Issue 2 Bipolar Disorder Edited by E. Sherwood Brown
  • Volume 28, Issue 1 Obesity: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals Edited by Thomas A. Wadden, Albert J. Stunkard, Robert I. Berkowitz
  • Volume 27, Issue 4 Addictive Disorders Edited by Norman S. Miller, MD, JD and Kathleen T. Brady, MD, PhD
  • Volume 27, Issue 3 Disaster Psychiatry: A Closer Look Edited by Craig L. Katz, MD and Anand Pandya, MD
  • Volume 27, Issue 2 Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Edited by Thomas J. Spencer, MD
  • Volume 27, Issue 1 Cognitive and Neurologic Impairments in Psychiatric Disorders Edited by Laura A. Flashman, PhD
  • Volume 26, Issue 4 Evidence-based Practices in Mental Health Care Edited by R.E. Drake, MD, PhD
  • Volume 26, Issue 3 Women’s Mental Health Edited by Susan G. Kornstein, MD Anita H. Clayton, MD
  • Volume 26, Issue 2 Drug Therapy: Predictors of Response Edited by Jerrold F. Rosenbaum, David L. Dunner
  • Volume 26, Issue 1 Schizophrenia: Contemporary Clinical Perspectives Edited by Peter F. Buckley
  • Volume 25, Issue 4 Spectrum Concepts in Major Mental Disorders Edited by Jack D. Maser, Hagop S. Akiskal
  • Volume 25, Issue 3 Ethics in Psychiatry Edited by Glen O. Gabbard
  • Volume 25, Issue 2 Recent Advances in the Study of Biological Alterations in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Edited by Rachel Yehuda
  • Volume 25, Issue 1 Psychiatry in the Medically Ill Edited by James L. Levenson, Constantine G. Lyketsos, Paula T. Trzepacz
  • Volume 24, Issue 4 Social Anxiety Disorder Edited by Franklin R. Schneier
  • Volume 24, Issue 3 Cultural Psychiatry: International Perspectives Edited by Juan Enrique Mezzich, Horacio Fàbrega Jr
  • Volume 24, Issue 2 Eating Disorders Edited by Arnold E. Andersen
  • Volume 24, Issue 1 Generalized Anxiety Disorder Edited by Olga Brawman-Intzer
  • Volume 23, Issue 4 Depression: Recent Developments and Innovative Treatments Edited by Andrew A. Nierenberg
  • Volume 23, Issue 3 Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders Edited by Eric Hollander, Andrea. Allen
  • Volume 23, Issue 2 Managed Care and Mental Health Edited by Stephen M. Soreff
  • Volume 23, Issue 1 Borderline Personality Disorder Edited by Joel Paris

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PPT - Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder PowerPoint Presentation

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) - Psychiatric Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

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    • Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurrent, persistent, unwanted, and intrusive thoughts, urges, or images (obsessions) and/or by repetitive behaviors or mental acts that patients feel driven to do (compulsions) to try to lessen or prevent the anxiety that obsessions cause. Diagnosis is based on history. Treatment consists of psychotherapy (specifically, exposure and response prevention), drug therapy (specifically, SSRIs or clomipramine ), or, especially in severe cases, both.

    OCD is slightly more common among women than men and affects about 1 to 2% of the population. Up to 30% of people with OCD also have a past or current tic disorder (see Tic Disorders and Tourette Syndrome in Children and Adolescents ).

    Symptoms and Signs

    Obsessions are unwanted, intrusive thoughts, urges, or images, the presence of which usually cause marked distress or anxiety. The dominant theme of the obsessive thoughts may be harm, risk to self or others, danger, contamination, doubt, loss, or aggression. For example, patients may obsess about becoming contaminated with dirt or germs unless they wash their hands for ≥ 2 h a day. The obsessions are not pleasurable. Thus, patients try to ignore and/or suppress the thoughts, urges, or images. Or they try to neutralize them by performing a compulsion.

    Compulsions (often called rituals) are excessive, repetitive, purposeful behaviors that affected people feel they must do to prevent or reduce the anxiety caused by their obsessive thoughts or to neutralize their obsessions. Examples are

    Washing (eg, handwashing, showering),

    Checking (eg, that the stove is turned off, that doors are locked)

    Counting (eg, repeating a behavior a certain number of times)

    Ordering (eg, arranging tableware or workspace items in a specific pattern)

    Most rituals, such as hand washing or checking locks, are observable, but some mental rituals, such as silent repetitive counting or statements muttered under the breath, are not. Typically, the compulsive rituals must be done in a precise way according to rigid rules. The rituals may or may not be connected realistically to the feared event. When connected realistically (eg, showering to avoid being dirty, checking the stove to prevent fire), the compulsions are clearly excessive—eg, showering for hours each day or always checking the stove 30 times before leaving the house. In all cases, the obsessions and/or compulsions must be time-consuming (> 1 h/day, often much more) or cause patients significant distress or impairment in functioning; at their extreme, obsessions and compulsions may be incapacitating.

    The degree of insight varies. Most people with OCD recognize to some degree that the beliefs underlying their obsessions are not realistic (eg, that they really will not get cancer if they touch an ashtray). However, occasionally, insight is completely lacking (ie, patients are convinced that the beliefs underlying their obsessions are true and that their compulsions are reasonable).

    Because people with this disorder fear embarrassment or stigmatization, they often conceal their obsessions and rituals. Relationships often deteriorate, and performance in school or at work may decline. Depression is a common secondary feature.

    Diagnosis

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